Fonds F03 - Killam General Hospital, Alta. fonds

Open original Digital object

Title and statement of responsibility area

Title proper

Killam General Hospital, Alta. fonds

General material designation

  • Multiple media

Parallel title

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Title statements of responsibility

Title notes

  • Source of title proper: Title is based on the contents of the fonds.

Level of description

Fonds

Reference code

CA ON00279 F03

Edition area

Edition statement

Edition statement of responsibility

Class of material specific details area

Statement of scale (cartographic)

Statement of projection (cartographic)

Statement of coordinates (cartographic)

Statement of scale (architectural)

Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

Dates of creation area

Date(s)

  • 1930-2010, predominant 1963-2010 (Creation)
    Creator
    Killam General Hospital, Alta.

Physical description area

Physical description

10 cm of textual material
125 photographs
5 postcards
1 architectural drawing

Publisher's series area

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Numbering within publisher's series

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Archival description area

Name of creator

(1930-1990)

Administrative history

In 1930, the Sisters of St. Joseph opened Killam General Hospital, which remained open the longest of the four hospitals which they started in Alberta. Two years later, St. Paul's Hospital began in Rimbey. The hospital in Stettler had opened in 1926 and closed a year later, while the hospital in Galahad had opened in 1926.

In 1930, the F. E. Nichol home was purchased by the Sisters for the construction of the hospital in Killam. At this time, there were no grants from the provincial government for the construction or operation of the hospital. Killam General Hospital was given this name to demonstrate that all patients would be treated, no matter with which religion they were affiliated. Sister Jane Frances O'Rourke took charge of the hospital soon after opening. Sister Loyola Donovan followed as Superior and Administrator. In 1945, the hospital had 15 beds.

By 1946, the people in the community had observed for some time that a larger hospital was needed, and thus a wing was added to the hospital. In 1958, the Alberta Hospitalization Plan was put in place, and the Killam General Hospital was one of the first of Alberta's voluntary hospitals to adopt the idea of inviting lay persons of the community to help with hospital management.

In 1959, Sister Mary Lourdes Therens became the new administrator for the hospital. In 1963, during her time as administrator, a new hospital, chapel and residence for the Sisters was opened.

The Flagstaff Beaver Auxiliary Hospital was built and originally owned by the county, which had wanted a long-term care hospital. It was a separate corporation with its own board of directors.The county asked Sister Lourdes and Sister St. Bride if they would operate the hospital for the county. They agreed to do so, and it was administered along with Killam General Hospital as one facility but two separate corporations. There was an Administrator who was a Sister who oversaw a Director of Nurses position in each hospital. These positions were also filled by Sisters. The Auxiliary Hospital and General Hospital were connected by a corridor with double doors that were always left open. The Convent was also attached to the building. The Auxiliary Hospital shared the kitchen and boiler system with the General Hospital and the county paid a certain amount for this shared usage. The lab and x-ray departments were shared between the hospitals, and patients from the General Hospital went to the physiotherapy and occupational therapy departments which were at the Auxiliary Hospital. The Auxiliary Hospital provided long-term care and was known as the geriatric wing. The Auxiliary Hospital had 50 beds, and the Killam General Hospital had a small nursery.

In 1970, Sister Mary Kevin Moran became the new administrator for the complex. There was some lobbying for the Killam General Hospital to be turned over to the county, but the Sisters resisted this for twelve years. In the end, the county turned the Auxiliary Hospital over to the Killam General hospital.

The Killam General Hospital was in operation from 1930-1990 under the direction of the Sisters of St. Joseph. In 1990, the Sisters withdrew from operation of the Killam General and Flagstaff Beaver Auxiliary Hospitals. In 1990, the hospitals were renamed the Killam Hospital Complex. At this point, the hospitals had 30 active beds and 150 chronic beds. In 2002, ownership was transferred to Alberta Catholic Health Corporation. The Convent was rented to home care for five years and is now also owned by the Alberta Catholic Hospital Corporation. The former Convent houses doctors' offices today. The hospital complex was later named Killam Health Care Centre.

Custodial history

Scope and content

The fonds consists of histories for Killam, Galahad, Rimbey and Stettler hospitals that have been combined to create a history of the Alberta hospitals run by the Sisters of St. Joseph. Killam General Hospital was opened for the longest period of all these hospitals, and therefore a large quantity of the combined history is about this hospital. Along with the series for the histories of the four hospitals, there are series for commemorative and administrative materials. The fonds contains community histories, a timeline, staff listings, correspondence, newsletters, pamphlets, and photographs.

Notes area

Physical condition

Immediate source of acquisition

The records were transferred from the Sisters in Alberta to the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph in Canada - London site archives.

Arrangement

Language of material

  • English

Script of material

Location of originals

The records are located at the Congregation of the Sisters of St. Joseph in Canada - London site archives.

Availability of other formats

Restrictions on access

F03-S003-01 General Hospital and Flagstaff Beaver Auxiliary 1930-1990 is restricted to the public.

Terms governing use, reproduction, and publication

Finding aids

There is a series and file list.

Associated materials

Related materials

Accruals

The fonds is considered closed.

Alternative identifier(s)

Standard number area

Standard number

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Description record identifier

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Rules or conventions

Status

Final

Level of detail

Partial

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

July 2, 2014

Language of description

  • English

Script of description

Sources

Sisters Kateri Ghesquiere, Theresa Carmel Slavik, and St. Bride Laverty, pers. comm., 2014.

M. Doyle (ed.), and C. Dignan (ed.), Contribution of the Sisters of St. Joseph of the Diocese of London to the Hospital and Health Care Services in Canada (1888-1992).

G. J. Humbert, A Compendium of the Catholic Health Association of Canada, Catholic Health Alliance of Canada, 2011.

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Accession area