Affichage de 7 résultats

Objet d'information
Seulement les descriptions de haut niveau City of Kitchener Corporate Archives
Aperçu avant impression Affichage :

Kitchener's Farmer's Market fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1869 - 2012

For over 140 years there has been a farmers market building in the city of Berlin/Kitchener. At its peak, the market was known as one of the best farmers markets in North America. The market was frequently visited by many people who came back regularly to the same vendors over the many years. Busloads of people came to the Saturday market and it was one of the main attractions in Kitchener. The market buildings have changed and have been modernized over the years. There has been controversy associated around the market but today it still operates a Saturday market. The Kitchener Farmer’s market has changed locations over the many years but the tradition of the market still continues to be a part of Kitchener’s cultural identity.

      There has been a market held in the city going as far back 1839.  Jacob Y. Shantz was the pioneer of the first market building in Berlin.  In 1869 for under $4,000, he erected a two story building that not only held the market but the council chambers and post office.  On Saturday mornings farmers traveled to the market by horse and buggy to sell their items.  In 1872 a long, low building was erected behind the original building.   For the next 35 years, farmers came to sell produce, livestock, vegetables and other items in the market building.

In 1907 a larger building was required and a two story red brick building was erected for just under $18,000. For over 60 years the market was held inside and outside of this building. The market was thriving in the 1950’s and 1960’s. There were as many as 350 farmers and over 500 tables inside the building and 150 tables outside the building for regular venders. Vendors arrived as early as 5 a.m. to set up their stalls. Outside stalls cost $40.00 to $60.00 and inside stalls ran from $20.00 to $150.00. Meat, poultry, eggs, vegetables, fruit, cheese, flowers, plants, baked goods, bread, crafts were many of the food and other items sold.

In the 1960’s refrigeration was suggested for the perishables items. The idea was not met with much support. Vendors did not want to be forced to add refrigeration to their counters. Council approved an idea to cover 40 of the outside market stands. Discussions were taking place on the possibility of the market moving from the location behind city hall. A survey was taken of market customers and King St. merchants. Market customers were asked if the market was moved to the outskirts of Kitchener, would they visit more, less or the same amount. No specific location was given as to where the market would be located. The results were that they would visit more or about the same if the market was moved. King St. merchants were overwhelming in favour of not moving the market out of the downtown core. The decision was made by Council not move the market at that particular time. Rental rates were increased in 1971. Inside stall rose to between $35.00 to $200.00 and outside stalls rose from $75.00 to $95.00.

In 1971 the city council announced the plans to demolish the old market building and the city hall. The market would be relocated to the new shopping complex that would be built on the land. This became a very controversial matter in the downtown redevelopment. The plan was to keep the look of the inside of the new market similar to the old market. The interior of the new market would have wood pillars and beams, plaster walls on the lower floor and brick walls on the upper floor. Proper refrigeration facilities would be added for all perishables. The final market day in the 1907 building was held on August 1, 1973. An estimated crowd of 8,000 people attended the last market before demolition. A farewell to the old building was commemorated by a ‘Tradition on the Move’ luncheon for the vendors and guests. A market bell was presented for installation in the new building. A plaque commemorating the markets’ move was also presented. Vendors and guests received a brick with a plaque as a memento. On August 4, the market was moved to the parking garage where it continued operations until the new structure was completed. More than 13,000 souvenir bricks were sold for $1.00 a piece over several months.

On June 29, 1974 the new market was open for business and over 10,000 people attended the opening day market. The market was an overwhelming success in the first month after opening. Crowds ranged from 17,000 to 20,000 on Saturdays up from between 12,000 to 14,000. On Wednesdays the attendance was up to 9,000 from 5,000. The official opening of the new market was held on October 12, 1974. Premier Bill Davis rang the market bell to commemorate the opening. The market continued to operate from this site for 30 years.

In the late 1990’s, the long-term Market Square lease was about to expire and the city began a search for a new location. The city began to buy up the land bounded by King, Eby, Duke and Cedar Sts. A 2001 survey was complied to ask residents questions regarding the new market. The ‘Your Kitchener Market’ opened on May 22, 2004 on King St. E. The Kitchener market today continues the tradition started over 130 years ago. Today, it is called the Kitchener Market and the International Cuisine and merchant upper level market vendors are open Tuesday to Friday from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Saturdays from 7 a.m. – 2 p.m. The lower level Farmer’s Market and the artisans and crafters on the upper level are open Saturday’s 7 a.m. – 2 p.m.

The fonds consists of minutes, historical information, plaques, drawings, blueprints and photographs. Other items are books, a bell and bricks.

1: Minutes/Reports – 1886 – 1981. 60cm

    This series consists of the minutes and reports of the market.

An index is available in Appendix A

  1. Textual Information – 1900’s – 2008. 60cm

     This series consists of newspaper articles, newsletters, books, and correspondence.

    An index is available in Appendix B

  2. Photographs – 1898 – 2005. 100cm

    This series consist of photographs, albums and mounted photographs.

An index is available in Appendix C.

  1. Videos, Cassettes and CD’s –1990 – 2006. 4cm

    This series consist of various videos, cassettes and cd’s.

An index is available in Appendix D.

  1. Artifacts – 1874 – 1981. 20cm

    This series consist of plaques and two bricks and a bell.

An index is available in Appendix E.

  1. Drawings/Blueprints – 1960’s – 2006. 20cm

    This series consist of architectural drawings, blueprints and floor plans.

An index is available in Appendix F.

  1. Ephemera – 2004 - 2012. 2cm

    This series consist of posters and brochures.

An index is available in Appendix G.

Appendix A
Series 1: Minutes/Reports

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Minutes –
Market Technical Advisory 1973 1-1 12608
Minutes -
Market Design Advisory 1973
1-2 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1975 1-3 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1976 1-4 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1977 1-5 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1978 1-6 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1979 1-7 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1980 1-8 12608
Minutes – Market Operating 1981 1-9 12608
Regulation –
Fruit Branchers 1931-1959 1-10 12608
Regulations –
Live Stock Products 1939 1-11 12608
Committee Minutes – Volume 35 1946-1947 2-1 12083
Committee Minutes – Volume 37 1948-1949 3-1 12079
Committee Minutes – Volume 38 1950-1951 4-1 12077
Committee Minutes – Volume 41 1952 5-1 12072
Committee Minutes – Volume 42 1953 6-1 12070
Committee Minutes – Volume 44 1954 7-1 12066
Committee Minutes – Volume 46 1955 8-1 12062
Committee Minutes – Volume 49 1956 9-1 12069
Committee Minutes – Volume 52 1957 10-1 12063
Committee Minutes – Volume 53 1958 11-1 12061
Committee Minutes – Volume 57 1959 12-1 12054
Committee Minutes – Volume 59 1960 13-1 12050
Committee Minutes – Volume 62 1961 14-1 12057
Committee Minutes – Volume 66 1886-1911 15-1 12049
Committee Minutes – Volume 72 1900-1911 16-1 12038

Appendix B
Series 2: Textual Information

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Farmers Market Study 1986-1987 17-1 11191
Promotional Information 2001-2006 17-2 11191
Promotional Information 2001-2006 17-5 11191
Background Information 1839-1997 18-1 10946
Book “The Story of Kitchener” 18-2 10946
Miscellaneous Information 1958-2000 18-4 10946
125th Anniversary Certificate 1994 18-7 10946
Market Clerk Position 1981-1986 19-1 10942
Magazine Article 1966-1974 19-5 10942
Newsletter 1994 19-6 10942
Market Business Plans 1995-1999 19-8 10942
Newspaper Articles 1980-1999 20-1 10934
"My Old Order Mennonite Heritage" –Book 1982 20-2 10934
Scrapbook 1971-1972 22-1 11093
Market Future Is Its Past - article 1989 23-5 9390
“The Kitchener Market Fight” – Book 1975 24-1 10358
Newspaper Article on Demolition of Market 1973 26-2 14310
Farmer’s Market Booklet 2000 27-1 11143
Ontario Superbuild Report 2003 27-2 11143
Newspaper Articles 2008 27-3 11143
Kitchener Market – Round 1 application 1978-1980 31-3 11999
Memorabilia 1984-1992 32-3 10944
Guest Books 1979-1991 32-4 10944
Promotional Information 1995-2001 36-1 12544
Newspaper Articles 1960’s 37-1 10143
Newspaper Articles 1970’s 37-2 10143
Market Postcard 1950’s 60-1 10906

Appendix C
Series 3: Photographs

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Photographs 1970’s-1990’s 18-3 10946
Photographs 1990-1990’s 18-6 10946
Slides 1969-1991 18-9 10946
Photo Albums (4) 1981-1995 19-4 10942
Photographs 1898-1906 19-7 10942
Photographs 1980’s 20-3 10934
Photo Albums (3) 1980’s 20-4 10934
Market Vendors 1960’s 21-1 11723
Market Photos 1960’s-2001 23-2 9390
Market Photo 1950’s 28-1 10925
Photograph 1960’s 30-1 11862
Photograph 1955 30-2 11862
Photograph 1900 30-3 11862
Photographs 1970 31-1 11999
Photographs Vendors 1980’s-1990’s 31-2 11999
Photographs 1960’s-1980’s 32-1 10944
Bicentennial Photograph 1984 32-2 10944
Photo Albums (2) 1995-2005 33-1 12289
Framed Photo 1980’s 39-1 CH 0009
Framed Photo 1950’s 40-1 CH 0010
Framed Photo 1950’s 41-1 CH 0011
Framed Photo 1950’s 42-1 CH 0012
Framed Photo 1800’s 43-1 CH 0013
Framed Photo 1950’s 44-1 CH 0014
Framed Photo 1930’s 45-1 CH 0015
Framed Photo 1950’s 46-1 CH 0016
Framed Photo 1900 47-1 CAO 0214
Framed Photo 1900’s 48-1 CAO 0217
Framed Photo 1900’s 49-1 CAO 0237
Oil Painting 50-1 0239
Photographs 1983-1994 51-1 10948
Photographs 1960’s-1990’s 52-1 12811
Story Boards 2003-2004 56-1 CH
Your Kitchener Opening 2004 57-1 11843
Slides n.d. 58-1 12996
Photographs n.d. 59-1 CH

Appendix D
Series 4: Videos, Cassettes and Cd’s

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Market CD 2001-2006 17-4 11191
Market Tapes 1991-1997 18-8 10946
Your Kitchener Market Opening CD 2004 29-1 10908
Your Kitchener Market CD 2005 33-2 12289
Cassettes 2002 53-1 14544
Videos 1990-2002 53-2 14544
Videos 1994-1996 54-1 14548
Cassettes 1991-1998 55-1 14549

Appendix E
Series 5: Artifacts

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Plaque 1981 19-2 10942
Plaque n.d. 19-3 10942
Bell 1874 25-1 shelf
Bricks 1973 26-1 14310
Triptech art 1976 34-1 @ Market
Plaque 1973 35-1 GR
Plaque – Jacob Shantz 1977 38-1 CH 0008

Appendix F
Series 6: Drawings/Blueprints

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Sketches 2001-2006 17-3 11191
Market Square Blueprints 1985 18-5 10946
Drawings 1960’s-2001 23-1 9390
Market Square Floor Plans 1980’s 23-3 9390
Market Blueprints 1980’s 23-4 9390

Appendix G
Series 7: Ephemera

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Posters 2007-2012 61-1 11281

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives

City of Kitchener - Victoria Park fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1894-2012

Victoria Park, in the heart of Kitchener (formerly Berlin) is a 59 acre park, beautifully landscaped in the18th century Romantic Landscape style.

Today's Victoria Park lies within Joseph Schneider's original Lot 17 of the German Company Tract. But the land was there long before the American settlers came from Pennsylvania. The swamp was the dominating feature of the land which was a favourite wintering area for the Aboriginal people. The extended family of Tuhbenahneequay (Sarah Jones, 1780-1873) was the last band of the New Credit Mississauguas to winter in the area that would become Victoria Park. Even after Joseph Schneider purchased and settled on the land in 1807, Tuhbenahneequay still wintered near the swamp. A bronze plaque placed in the park commemorates the natives, providing a link between today’s Victoria Park, the Aboriginals and other natives who treasured the site long before the town existed.

In the 1890’s, as the town began to grow, the old Town Park was thought to have limited facilities and located too far out of town. As the Schneider land had remained undeveloped, it was available in 1894 when a new park was under consideration. Before Joseph Schneider’s youngest grandson Samuel Schneider died, he made 45 transfers of land from the original farm. In 1894, 260 rate-payors signed a petition asking the Town Council to adopt the province’s Public Parks Act and to buy some of the Schneider land and the Berlin Athletic Club grounds. By provincial law, this petition compelled council to put the matter to a public vote. When the vote was taken and the Park Act was approved, the citizens felt that the more than 2 to 1 yes vote also implied the approval for the land purchases. When the Park Act was approved, the Town Council needed to appoint six men to a Board of Park Management. This Board would oversee all of the town parks.

In the fall of 1894, H. J. Bowman, the town’s first engineer, prepared a site plan for the new park. Berlin architect, William Hartmuth, upgraded and prepared a more detailed plan. The Park Board contacted George Ricker, a well-known landscape engineer from Buffalo New York for further advice. Mr. Ricker travelled to Berlin and gave the plans his enthusiastic approval with added suggestions of keeping the old Town Park for agricultural exhibitions, acquiring land for a new park and to put in a lake with islands and bridges in the new park. Before the purchases could be completed the Park Board needed to have agreement amongst themselves, but the Board was split down the middle between fixing up the old Town Park or in favour of a new park. In November of 1894 the board agreed to buy the 5 acres of athletic grounds from The Berlin Athletic Association and keep discussions under way with Samuel Schneider for his 28 acres of land. A short time later, a deal was struck with Samuel Schneider and the park would finally became a reality.

With Schneider Creek running through the land, work needed to begin on the development of the park. Tons of earth had to be removed to create the lake and the three surrounding islands. On December 17, 1894 the boundaries of the park were from David to Heins Sts., the Grand Trunk Railway tracks to Schneider Ave. and Roland to David Sts.

The park remained unnamed until December 26, 1895 when the Park Board passed By-law #2 and honoured Her Majesty the Queen by naming the park “Victoria”. Within the park the large island was named “Roos Island” after William Roos and the smaller island was named “Swan”. The upper island was not named until 1910 when the official name became Schneider Island in honour of the original land owner, Joseph Schneider. Both Swan and Schneider islands are nature sanctuaries.

During the parks first winter a dilemma developed, should the lake ice be used for Berliners to skate and play hockey on or be cut and sold for cooling purposes? Both ice skating and ice cutting co-existed grudgingly for many decades. By the late 1920’s the ice cutting enterprise ended and with better developed ice flooding, scraping and clearing techniques, skating and hockey continued. Victoria Park had become the home of one of the best outdoor rinks in the area.

The erecting of buildings and bridges began in the spring of 1896. The 12 foot wide and 86 foot long main bridge to Roos Island was completed. A major refurbishing of the bridge was undertaken in the 1970’s, and the original manufacturer’s medallion can still be seen today. Also in 1896 a boathouse was erected along David St. In 1929 this boathouse was replaced as it was badly deteriorating. In February 1967, a fire consumed part of the roof and upper floors of the building. Renovations began in the spring of that year and further renovations were completed in the 1980’s and 1990’s to make the building accessible. In the center of Roos Island the bandstand was also erected in 1896. It was demolished in 1950 and replaced with a square wooden structure. In 1985 the second bandstand was demolished and a replica of the original bandstand was erected. The comfort station built in 1910, is the oldest original building still standing within the park. In the 1990’s in preparation for the 100th anniversary of the park, plans were under way to create a museum within the comfort station.

The grand opening of the park was to have been held on July 1, 1896 with the Governor-General in attendance. A schedule change prevented the Governor-General from attending and the grand opening took place on August 27, 1896.

In 1897 funds were raised to have a Peace Memorial made and installed in the park. The memorial featured a copper bust of Kaiser Wilhelm I. In 1914, three young men removed the bust of Kaiser Wilhelm from the memorial and the bust ended up in the lake. The bust was recovered from the lake and for the duration of the war it was to be stored in the Germanic Concordia Society’s clubhouse. A few years later the bust was stolen again. The bust has never been recovered and its disappearance has become one of the park mysteries. On loan to Berlin from the old Department of War were two bronze cannons. The cannons were placed on Roos Island in 1896. One cannon was moved and placed directly in front of the Queen Victoria statue in 1910. Technically these cannons are still on loan and could be recalled at any time. Berlin received two other cannons and they were placed at the Courtland Ave. entrance and later moved and set in concrete in the playground area.

After the park was named for Queen Victoria, people began to wonder why there was nothing within the park to honour her namesake. It took many years and many money raising events to raise sufficient funds for a statue to be commissioned. The statue of Queen Victoria was sculpted by Raffaele Zacaquini of Italy. The pedestal base was made by Braun’s Marble Works of Berlin. The base is comprised of 36 slabs of Stanstead granite cemented together and placed on a cement foundation. The die is a solid cube of granite weighing 8 tons and was cemented on the base with lead. On May 29, 1911, the ten foot statue on the 18 foot pedestal was unveiled.

The Victoria Park pavilion was built in the Grand Victorian style and opened on August 15, 1902. On March 24, 1916 an unknown arsonist set the structure on fire. Firefighters were able to save half of the structure, but the Park board decided against rebuilding at that time. So the entire structure was removed and it was not until 1924 when a new pavilion was erected and opened in August of that year. In 1938 the building under went renovations and more renovations were completed in1978 per fire regulations and accessibility guidelines.

The area between today’s south and west grounds is now the playground area of the park. In the early years the area held a deer run and was loosely named a “zoo”. The deer run was installed in the early 1900’s. The first animals were four deer that were bought from the Muskoka area and through donations other animals were added over time. The park received two bear cubs in 1913 and bears lived in the park until the 1940’s. By the 1970’s the other animals were gradually eliminated. Today the park is still home to many varieties of wildlife such as ducks, mallards, gulls, Canadian geese, and other animals.

The first sets of gates into the park were a double set made of limestone. These were installed at the Water St. entrance in 1908. The other entrance gates were built at the Schneider Ave. entrance in 1921 and at the Courtland Ave. entrance in 1924. Entrance gates at Dill and Richmond Sts. were also added. One set of the gates from Water St. were moved and installed at the Park St. entrance in the 1980’s. The Richmond St. gates were demolished in 1970.

The athletic grounds had been in existence since the 1880’s, long before the park existed. By the early 1910’s the athletic park area was a fully fenced in area within the park. There was a grandstand and bleachers and lights were later added for evening events. The baseball field stand and fences were removed in 1966 when a new stadium was built. The old athletic park area is now a large open space which is used for the many events that take place in the park. Also the area now holds the clock tower that was removed from the 1921 City Hall and was rebuilt in 1995 at the Gaukel St. entrance.

A house was built for the Park superintendent in 1917 from reclaimed wood from the burnt pavilion. Under the direction of the park superintendent the first park greenhouse was built. A second greenhouse was added in the 1930’s and a third greenhouse was built later. All of the plant materials for the park were grown in the three greenhouses. In the 1970’s the greenhouses were removed from the park and moved to other city facilities. The park contains many varieties of trees, some of which have been in the park for decades. There are also many bushes, ornamental grasses and the planting beds are changed twice a year, with the spring bulbs first and then the annual plantings. There is an English garden and Rose garden in the park.

Today, Victoria Park is bisected by a major road. This road was just a park driveway in the early years. Over the years several of the parks roadways have been closed to reduce car traffic through the park.

Unofficially from the earliest days, the park lake was used as a pool. Officially the first park public swimming pool was in 1921, when a hole was dug out at the upper end of the park and a floodgate was built into the bridge. The hole was lined with wood and then gravel. Unfortunately, for sanitary reasons the pool closed within 3 years. The still standing wading pool was built by the YMCA in 1952. Between the south and west grounds, a playground area was set up. In 1996-1997 a renewal of the playground was completed.

The fountain bridge that was built in 1965 connects Park St. to the other side of the park. The bubbling action of the fountain helps to aerate the water in the lake during the summer.

Today, Victoria Park continues to have children play; now using the playground equipment as well as people continuing to enjoy the quiet nature of the park. Skating no longer takes place on the lake, but a rink is now used for hockey and skating. After over 100 years, Victoria Park is still a thriving destination for residents and visitors.
The fonds consists of documents from the Board of Park Management, Parks and Recreation Commission and various documents from the Victoria Park 90th and 100the anniversaries. The fonds also consists of photographs, newspaper articles, maps and books.

1: Board of Park Management – 1894-1966. – 2 m of textual records, 12 cm photographs/maps/blueprints/plans.

This series contains minutes, correspondence, subject files, financial records, reports, Board and City by-laws, agendas, resolutions, plans, and photographs of the Board. Many of the documents reference Victoria Park.

An index is available in Appendix A.

2: Parks and Recreation Commission. – 1963-1973. – 1 m textual records.

This series consists of minutes, agendas, reports, City By-Laws, agreements, financial records, plans and scrapbooks with many documents referencing Victoria Park

An index is available in Appendix B.

3: Photographs/Audio. – 1991-1996.– 1m photographs.

This series consists primarily of photographs of Victoria Park, park buildings, bridges and park events.

An index is available in Appendix C.

4: 90th Anniversary. – 1986.-10cm textual records, 12 cm photographs.

This series is comprised of photographs, news releases of the anniversary.

An index is available in Appendix D.

5: 100th Anniversary.-Sept 13-19, 1993.-10 cm textual records, 10 cm photographs.

This series consists primarily of photographs and history and information of the anniversary.

An index is available in Appendix E.

6: Historical Documentation. – 1994 - 30 cm.

This series contains information from newspapers articles, scrap books, park events and history referencing Victoria Park.

An index is available in Appendix F.

7: Maps. – 1994 - 5 cm.

This series contains various maps of the park and one of the master plans.

An index is available in Appendix G.

APPENDIX A
Series 1: Board of Park Management

Title Date Box
Board of Park Management fonds 1893-1969 See: Board of Park Management fonds

APPENDIX B
Series 2: Parks and Recreation Commission

Title Date Box
Parks and Recreation Commission fonds 1963-1973 See: Parks and Recreation Commission

APPENDIX C
Series 3: Photographs/Audio

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Photographs of Events 1969-1972 1-2 10827
Photographs 1983-1994 2-1 10948
Photographs 1960’s 5-10 10937
Flooding and Bridges 1975-1988 5-20 10937
Bridge photograph 1993 5-21 10937
Photographs 1996 7-1 11723
Planting 1990-1993 7-2 11723
Photographs 2000 16-1 11176
Victoria Park Bridge (Christmas) 1990’s 17-1 11147
Photographs 1950’s 18-1 11146
Victoria Park Lake 1950’s 19-1 10925
Photo Album 1970’s 23-1 12284
Photo Album 1970’s 23-2 12284
Photo Album 1990’s 23-3 12284
Photo Album 1990’s 23-4 12284
Victoria Park Pavilion 1970’s 24-1 12289
Photo Album 1990’s 25-1 12290
Photo Album 1990’s 25-2 12290
Photographs 1963-2003 26-1 12119
Photographs 1971-1998 27-1 12118
Photographs 1994-2006 28-1 11912
Photographs 1974-1991 29-1 12120
Athletic Ground 1964 30-1 12458
Photographs 1993-2002 32-1 14314
Photographs 1996 33-1 13711
Video 1990’s 34-1 14544
Video 1998 35-1 14548
Photographs 1995-2004 36-1 13592

APPENDIX D
Series 4: 90th Anniversary

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Historical Information 1924 4-1 10940
Anniversary articles 1986 4-2 10940
Anniversary Program 1986 5-6 10937

APPENDIX E
Series 5: 100th Anniversary

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Historical Information 1897-1996 5-13 10937
Historical info and band shell photo 1993 5-14 10937
Anniversary advertising 1996 5-15 10937
Article of Future of Park 1996 5-16 10937
100th Anniversary Negatives 1996 10-1 10919
100th Anniversary Photos 1996 10-2 10919
100th Anniversary Photos 1996 11-1 10171
Anniversary Postcards 1996 20-1 10913

APPENDIX F
Series 6: Historical Documentation
Title Date Volume/Item Box
Historical Information 1895-1980 1-1 10827
Clock Tower 1995 3-1 10946
Clock Tower reconstruction 1983 3-2 10946
Historical Information 1989 5-1 10937
Park By-laws 1895 5-2 10937
Pictorial history of park 1989 5-3 10937
90th Anniversary information 1990 5-4 10937
Pump and Fountain 1983-1991 5-5 10937
Newspaper articles 1915-1996 5-7 10937
Calendars 2002-2003 58 10937
Park Lighting 1915-1996 5-9 10937
Historical Committee Report 1986-1994 5-11 10937
Victoria Park Historical Society report 1999 5-12 10937
Victoria Park Info 1977-1991 5-17 10937
Comfort Station floor plan 1999 5-18 10937
Articles on flooding and bridges 1975-1988 5-19 10937
Unveiling Queen Victoria statue 1910 5-22 10937
Boathouse articles 1975-1988 6-1 10932
Boathouse timeline 1975-1988 6-2 10932
Scrapbooks 1976-1995 8-1 10922
Scrapbooks 1973-1975 9-1 10920
Letter regarding restoration of 1896 Grand Opening poster 1992 12-1 10170
Grand Opening Posters 1896 13-1 12002
Air Force Memorial 1960’s 21-1 P1 cabinet
Dorothy Russell 2006 22-1 12418

APPENDIX G
Series 7: Maps
Title Date Volume/Item Box
Park Maps 1986 5-23 10937
Aerial Map of Victoria Park 1970 14-1 AM0006
Victoria Park Map 1960’s 15-1 CSM012
Victoria Park Master Plan 1973-1977 31-1 CH archives

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives

City of Kitchener - Mayor's and Council fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1854-2012

The first elected official of the incorporated village of Berlin was Dr. John Scott. He was elected warden in 1854. The other officials that year were G. W. Bowman, G. Jantz, and H. Stroh and E. Zeigler. Mayor in 1870 at the time of Berlin becoming a town was Hugo Kranz. In 1912 when Berlin became a city, the mayor was W. H. Schmalz. At the time of the name change from Berlin to Kitchener in 1916 the mayor was J. E. Hett.

In the early years the council numbers were as high as 16 members including a mayor, deputy reeves and a warden. The numbers decreased over the years and in the 1940’s there were only 9 members including the mayor. By the mid 1950’s the number increased to 10 members of council plus the mayor. The number of councilors stayed the same until 2000 when the number decreased to 6 plus the mayor. During 2006, talks have taking place to increase the number of councilors, and in the 2010 election the number of councilors increased back to 10.

Elections took place in early December of year each. During the 1956 election, voters were asked to vote on the extending the term to two years. In a narrow defeat by 84 votes, it was rejected. During the 1960 election, voters were asked, “Are you in favor of extending the right to vote at municipal elections for members of council to all persons of the full age of twenty-one years who are British subjects and who have resided in the municipality for at least one year in accordance with municipal franchise extension act of 1958?” This was passed by 7,264 votes. In 1962, residents were asked again to vote on extending the term to two years. This time, by 6,406 votes, it was passed. Two year terms continued until 1971. There was another municipal election in October 1972 and then the two year terms continued until 1982. Three year terms began in 1982 and continued until 2006 when 4 year terms began.

In 1974, talk of the city implementing the ward system surfaced. On the ballots during 1974 election, two questions were asked ‘Are you in favour of the election of Aldermen by wards rather than by a general election?’ and ‘Are you in favour of a candidate for the office of Alderman being allowed to stand for election only in the ward in which he resides or in which he is qualified to vote in the event that a ward system of elections is adopted?’ Electorates voted yes on both of these questions. So the process of deciding new ward boundaries began. In 1977, a new Votomatic election system was looked to use in the next election. It was recommended to adopt this system at the time the new ward system was being implemented since all polling stations were being altered to reflect the new ward boundaries. The first ward based election took place in 1978 with the new non-paper based ballot system.

The first televised council meeting in the new council chambers took place on September 27, 1993.  The City of Kitchener continues to have the council meetings televised on a regular basis.

Members of Council with 20 or more years of service:

Dominic Cardillo – 1963-1982; 1983-1994 (M)
Geoff Lorentz – 1989- 2010
C. Siebert – 1932; 1937-38; 1940-45; 1947-56; 1961
John Smola – 1984- 2010
Henry Sturm – 1924-26; 1928; 1930-32, 1933-34 (M); 1936-42; 1944-53
Christina Weylie – 1984-2010
Carl Zehr – 1986-94; 1997- current (M)
Jim Zeigler – 1981-2002

The fonds consists of books, background information, newspaper articles, mementoes, videos and photographs

1: Correspondence – 1926 – 2012. 50cm

    This series consists of the correspondence and background information of the city council.

An index is available in Appendix A

  1. Photographs/Negatives – 1980 – 2000. 30cm

     This series consists of photo albums and photographs of mayors and council members and events.

    An index is available in Appendix B

  2. Videos – 1973-2005. 60cm.

    This series consist of videos of council meetings.

An index is available in Appendix C.

  1. Artifacts – 20cm.

    This series consist of pins, coins, coat of arms and a poster.

An index is available in Appendix D.

Appendix A
Series 1: Correspondence

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Guest Books 1939-1985 1-1 10910
Newspaper section on D. Cardillo 1994 2-1 10908
A Loving Look – Book 1984 2-2 10908
Miscellaneous correspondence 1984-1999 3-1 12002
Newspaper articles 1990-2005 4-1 11142
Spanish Magazine article on Mayor 2005 4-2 11142
Background Information 1854-1988 5-1 11143
Dominic Cardillo 25th Anniversary 1988 6-1 10942
Election Information 1988 6-2 10942
Invitation/programs 1999-2010 7-1 10913
Council Chamber Motion form 8-1 10906
Chain of Office 1985-1986 9-1 10171
Newspaper Articles 1950’s-1990’s 10-1 10158
Ward/Realignment Information 1926-1996 11-1 12855
General Information 1971-1975 12-1 11095
List of Kitchener Council Members 1854-2012 13-1 Excel spreadsheet
List of Kitchener Council – Years of Service 1854-2012 14-1 Word Document
Coat of Arms and Crest 1925 15-1 10141
List of Mementos 1991-1994 16-1 10927
Dominic Cardillo 16-2 10927
List of Mayor & Council 1854-2006 18-2 10929
Information 1988 32-1 10942
List of Historical Files n.d. 34-2 11723
Mayor’s remarks – Laurier 2006 37-1 11249
Dominic Cardillo 1930-1994 39-1 13305
Memento 2003 42-1 10843
City of Kitchener Meeting Schedule 2009-2012 43-1 11898
Posters re: Council 2007 44-1 11281
Crest & Seal 1916 46-1 10911
Articles Council members 2009 47-1 12418
Cheque 2008 48-1 14384

Appendix B
Series 2: Photographs/Negatives

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Photographs 1990’s 17-1 10919
Photographs – Mayor/Council events 1980’s-1990’s 17-2 10919
Mayor/Council Photographs 1981-2006 18-1 10929
Photographs 1980-1997 19-1 10921
Council Chamber n.d. 20-1 10927
Photographs 1980-2000 21-1 13711
Photographs n.d. 22-1 11176
Photographs 1995-1997 23-1 10948
Photographs 1980’s – 1990’s 24-1 10140
Photographs 1980’s 25-1 11146
Photographs 1983-1994 31-1 10948
Photographs 1998 34-1 11723
Negatives n.d. 35-1 10935
Photographs 1986 36-1 10905
Photos Chain of Office 2011 38-1 11898
Dominic Cardillo 1930-1994 39-2 13305
Negatives of Councillors 2003 41-1 12296
Council negatives 45-1 13592

Appendix C
Series 3: Videos

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Council Meetings 1990-2003 26-1 11177
Council Meetings 1973-2005 27-1 14534
Council Meetings 2006-2008 40-1 12990

Appendix D
Series 4: Artifacts

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Silver Spoons 1995 4-3 11142
Pins/coins 1990’s 27-2 14534
Corporate Seal n.d. 28-1 10138
Corporate Seal n.d. 29-1 11182
Poster n.d. 30-1 11201
Nickels 1937-1944 33-1 10945

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives

City of Kitchener - Municipal Elections fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1916-2010

Municipal elections have been held yearly, bi-yearly, every three and now every four years. Citizens have been asked to elect mayors, council members (aldermen), wardens, reeves, Public Utilities Commission members, Water Commissioners, Board of Education Public/Separate School members, and Roman Catholic Separate School Board Trustees over the years. Voter turnout for municipal elections has not been known to be high. There have been years where it has been as low as 29% and as high as 60%.

For the City of Kitchener, referendums and questions have been put to the electorate over the years. In 1930 voters were asked to pass a by-law for market improvement which they did. Also in 1930 the question regarding daylight savings time was put to voters for the first time, it was turned down. Again in 1936, and 1957, it was put to voters, it only passed in 1957. The question regarding having two year terms for council was put forth in 1939, 1940, 1956 and 1962. It was passed in 1962. The change to three year terms began in 1982 and four year terms began in 2006. In 1960 and 1962, voters were asked to vote on movie theatres opening on Sundays, it was not passed, but was passed in 1965. In 1967, voters were asked to vote on fluoridation of the water and it was not passed.

The question in the 1974 election was regarding the ward system. Two questions were asked, ‘Are you in favour of the election of Aldermen by wards rather then by a general election?’ and ‘Are you in favour of a candidate for the office of Alderman being allowed to stand for election only in the ward in which he resides or in which he is qualified to vote in the event that a ward system of elections is adopted? Both questions were passed. In 1976 the ward question was asked again with the second question changing. Question one, ‘Are you in favour of the election of Aldermen to City Council by wards? It was passed. Question two, ‘If a ward system of electing Aldermen to City Council is adopted, would you favour – a) A Council of 10 Aldermen with 1 Alderman elected from each of 10 wards. The 8 Aldermen to sit on Regional Council to be selected by City Council? or b) A Council of 16 Aldermen with 1 Alderman elected from each of 8 wards and 8 Aldermen elected at large. The 8 Aldermen elected by wards to sit on City Council only and the 8 Aldermen elected at large to sit on both City Council and Regional Council? Option ‘a’ was selected by voters.

In 2001 the number of councillors decreased to 6 and in the most recent election in 2010 the number increased to ten.

This fonds consists of correspondence, maps, videos and a voting machine and ballots

1: Correspondence – 1916 – 2007. 30cm

    This series consists of the correspondence, newspaper articles regarding municipal elections of the City of Kitchener.

An index is available in Appendix A.

2: Artifacts – 1972 – 1999. 10cm

This series consists of a voting machine used during municipal elections of the City of Kitchener.

An index is available in Appendix B.

3: Videos – 1990 – 1999. 11cm

This series consists of videos of election debates of the City of Kitchener.

An index is available in Appendix C.

4: Maps – 1990 – 1999. 11cm

This series consists of ward maps of the City of Kitchener.

An index is available in Appendix D.

Appendix A
Series 1: Correspondence

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Ward/referendum information 1926-2000 1-1 12855
Voting machine instructions 1990’s 2-1 12464
Newspaper Articles 1970’s 3-1 10158
Election Information 1988 4-1 10942
Amalgamation Information 1963-1967 5-1 10171
Amalgamation Information 1916-1979 5-2 10171
Amalgamation Information 1955-1959 5-3 10171
Amalgamation Information 1980’s 6-1 11173
Posters 2007 10-1 11281
Regional Reform 1999 13-1 13599

Appendix B
Series 2: Artifacts

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Voting machine 1990’s 2-2 12464
Election ballots 1972-1976 7-1 10140
Election ballots n.d. 8-1 10911

Appendix C
Series 3: Videos
Title Date Volume/Item Box
Election/debate videos 1990-2004 9-1 11177

Appendix D
Series 4: Maps

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Ward Maps n.d. 11-1 11195
Election Ward Maps 1991-1997 12-1 CH

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives

City of Kitchener - Forsyth fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1903-2010

John Derby Claude Forsyth was 18 years old and clerking at Boehmer’s General Store in Berlin in 1903, when he indicated the desire to be in business for himself. In that year, he left the general store and started to work for his father, John Forsyth in the button industry.

In 1905, with the idea to manufacture men’s shirts, he contracted with a company to make garments to order. But he found that his smaller orders were being passed over for larger orders. In 1906 he contacted Henry Hagen, a partner in Hagen & Sippel, a shoe firm where Mr. Hagen would cut and make the shirts and J. D. C. would supply the materials and sell the garments. On July 4, 1906, the first shirt to bear the Forsyth label was produced. During that year, the plant had 20 machines and 4 women working to produce shirts.

During 1907, business increased and larger space was needed for the increased in machinery. There was a staff of 30 women with 24 machines. In 1910 the business expanded again and moved into the space vacated by his fathers’ button business. There were a total of 48 machines, with a staff of 60 women working in the space. J. D. C. Forsyth assumed the entire industry in 1912. In 1915, underwear and pajamas were added to the product line. In 1916, more space was needed and the underwear/pajama production was moved to Waterloo.

On July 29, 1917 the company moved to new quarters previously occupied by the Breithaupt Company on corner of Young and Duke Streets. The underwear/pajama production moved back to the more spacious new building in 1918 and then moved back to Waterloo in 1920. Between 1920 and 1928 the total number of shirt machines grew to 152. By 1928 a new warehouse and modern laundry were added to the Duke Street factory, which now had 500 employees and 26 salesmen. At the time of purchase of the new building a residence named the Smyth House stood between the Duke Street side of the building and the street. In 1929, the company purchased the Smyth House and the residence and vacant space between the house and the building were rebuilt to serve as office space.

In January 1931, a new endeavour began with the manufacturing of ties, scarves and handkerchiefs. Expansion was taking place again and a 4-storey addition with a dining room and a roof garden were added for employees to the Kitchener building. In 1939 another expansion took place with a 3,600 sq. ft. addition to manufacture products other than shirts.

The Forsyth Athletic Association, a voluntary organization formed by employees began in 1935. The association began so that Forsyth employees had the opportunity to engage in a variety of sports and activities. They expanded and published a newsletter, “Shirt Tales” that began in February 1936.

The man with the vision, John Derby Claude Forsyth died in 1948 and his oldest son, John Edward Forsyth became president his other son James R. E. Forsyth became sales manager. The production of pajamas and underwear moved to a plant in Wellesley and the Waterloo plant began to manufacture sport and leisure shirts.

By 1956, the Forsyth Co. had 600 employees and over 140,000 sq. ft. of manufacturing space. The company had become one of Canada’s top three shirt manufacturing companies. Lady shirts and pajamas were added to the product line in 1961. In the 1960’s Forsyth Co. began exporting shirts to Hong Kong and Hawaii as well as forming a Quebec company, St Jean Forsyth Co. The company also completed a franchise agreement with a firm in Panama. The company has 800 employees in the Waterloo Region by the mid 1960’s.

Ending 70 years as a family-owned and operated manufacturer, Forsyth Co. was purchased by Dylex Ltd. of Toronto in 1973. In 1992, the Kitchener factory closes and the employees move to Cambridge. The building on the corner of Duke and Young was put up for sale and by 1999 no buyer had been found. The Forsyth Co. label still continues to this day with the company based out of Mississauga Ontario.

Unfortunately by 2006, the building was in disrepair and was demolished. Before demolition a time capsule was uncovered within the Art Deco building which fronted Duke Street. The time capsule was placed by then president John Derby Claude Forsyth’s twelve year old son, John Forsyth on June 4, 1937. The time capsule was given to the City of Kitchener’s Corporate Archives and it was opened on May 12, 2006. The time capsule was a silver metal box with “Forsyth” engraved on the outside. Within the box was a gold inscribed box containing the 800,000th Country Club shirt in its original packaging. The shirt was well-preserved with only a little mould which was caused by plastic packaging. There were two official documents in the capsule, one signed on June 4, 1937, a tribute to John D. Forsyth who’s name the Forsyth Company bears. The second was a velum covered document tied together with a red ribbon signed by the Forsyth family and management containing 15 pages of signatures of employees working at the factory and their length of service. There was also a photograph of John Derby Claude Forsyth in his office dated June 4, 1936. Also in the capsule were two editions of the Kitchener Daily Record newspaper June 2, 1937 with the headline “Building Values Best in 7 Years” concerning the Forsyth building and another newspaper dated May 12, 1937 with the headline “George then VI crowned King”. Also in the time capsule were the first two editions of “Shirt Tales”, the newsletter of the newly founded Forsyth Athletic Association, dated February 18, 1936 and March 27, 1936. All of the contents found in the time capsule were found to be very well preserved. The opening of the capsule was attended by some Forsyth family members.

The Forsyth corporate records are at Western University Archives in London Ontario.

1: Correspondence – 1903 – 2008. 5cm

    This series consists of the correspondence, newspaper articles regarding municipal elections of the City of Kitchener.

An index is available in Appendix A.

2: Time Capsule – 1936-1937. 35cm

This series consists of the items contained in the time capsule and the time capsule itself.

An index is available in Appendix B.

3: Photographs/Negatives/Slides/Sound Recordings – 1930 – 2001. 35cm

This series consists of photographs of company teams to employees working machinery and promotional photographs.

An index is available in Appendix C.

4: Marketing items – 1916-1980. 50cm

This series consists of marketing/promotional items.

An index is available in Appendix D.

Appendix A
Series 1: Correspondence

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Bank Statement 1939-1940 1-1 11454
Book Inscription 2008 1-4 11454
Shirt Tales books 1942-1962 7-1 13268
Employee information 1960-1973 9-1 13303
Conference program 1951 9-11 13303
Forsyth timeline 1903-1935 9-12 13303
Article on cornerstone installation 1937 9-13 13303
Training Manual 1953 9-14 13303
Twenty year club invitations 1959-1964
9-15 13303
Help Wanted signs 1920-1959 9-16 13303
Conference program 1948 11-4 13269
Forsyth building demolition 2006 13-1 12264

Appendix B
Series 2: Time Capsule

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Time capsule 1937 2-1 CH
“Country Club” Shirt` 1937 3-1 12830
Gold Box with inscription 1937 4-1 12828
Official time capsule document 1937 5-1 12827
Employee document 1937 5-2 12827
Kitchener Daily Record Sections 1937 5-3 12827
Shirt Tales Newsletters 1936 5-4 12827
Date stone 1937 6-1 storage

Appendix C
Series 3: Photographs/Negatives/Slides/Sound Recordings

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Ladies at Forsyth 1951 1-2 11454
Forsyth machinery 1950’s 1-3 11454
J. D. C. Forsyth photograph 1936 5-5 12827
Merchandising photographs 1950-1969 9-3 13303
Negatives 1930-1959 9-5 13303
Photographs/Negatives merchandising 1960’s 9-6 13303
Photographs/Negatives machinery 1968 9-7 13303
Photographs – conference 1963 9-8 13303
Photographs – conference 1951 9-9 13303
Marketing/promotions photographs 1950-1955 9-10 13303
Ad campaign slides 1950-1970 9-17 13303
Employees working at machinery 1950-1970 9-18 13303
Promotional ads 1950-1970 9-19 13303
Promotional messages 1962-1968 9-20 13303
Photographs of advertisements and displays 1950-1979 10-1 13299
Employee photographs (team) 1937-1967 10-2 13299
Sizing information 1949-1967 10-3 13299
Ladies Athletic Teams 1930-1949 11-5 13269
Forsyth President photograph 1950’s 11-6 13269
Photographs 1950-1980’s 14-1 13712
Photographs/Negatives 1998-2001 15-1 11193
Photographs/Negatives 1993-2001 16-1 14314

Appendix D
Series 4: Marketing/Promotional

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Scrapbook of advertisements 1955-1959 8-1 13265
Clothier and Habderdasher magazines 1916 9-2 13303
Promotional/marketing items 1950-1960’s 9-4 13303
Marketing/window displays 1920-1979 10-4 13299
Promotional/marketing items 1916-1959 11-1 13269
Logo plates 1950-1980 11-2 13269
Scrapbook of advertisements 1963 11-3 13269

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives

History of the City of Kitchener fonds

  • Fonds
  • 1853-2012

Berlin/Kitchener's history dates back to 1784, when the land was given to the Six Nations by the British as a gift for their allegiance during the American Revolution. From 1796 and 1798, the Six Nations sold 38,000 hectares of this land to Col. Richard Beasley.
Title of the Beasley land to the German Company was completed in 1805 and that began the influx of more settlers to the area from Pennsylvania. Immigration to the town increased considerably from 1816 until the 1870s - many of the newcomers coming from Germany.
In 1833, the area was renamed Berlin; and in 1853 Berlin became the County Seat of the newly created County of Waterloo elevating it to the status of village with 1,000 citizens.
With the rise of population, services began to arrive. A public stage coach service began in 1835. A post office was finally opened in Berlin in 1842. Soon after, weekly mail service was available and in 1845 daily mail was introduced. Mail delivery service began in 1907. Berlin received its first bank in 1853, a branch of the Bank of Upper Canada opened on Queen St. In 1856, the Grand Truck Railway rolled through Berlin. It brought passenger and freight service to the village. In the late 1850’s, new industries began to arrive and schools were erected. The first sewer was laid between Queen and Ontario Sts running into Schneider’s pond in 1859. By the 1869, the village had its first town hall and farmer’s market.
In 1854, the first Reeve of the village of Berlin was John Scott. Other members of council are Gabriel W. Bowman, George Jantz, Henry Stroh and Enoch Ziegler. The village became a town in June of 1870 with the population of 2,636. The first mayor of the town was William Pipe in 1871. The town had 14 small industries in 1870 and had grown to 92 industries in 1900 with a population of 9,676. The population expanded to 12,125 in 1906 with 75 industries in the town. Berlin became the first town in the Dominion to secure cityhood when the Federal census placed its population over 15,000 citizens.
On October 10, 1910, Berlin was the first town in Ontario to receive hydroelectric power from Niagara.

As the Town Hall clock tower struck midnight on June 10, 1912, a royal proclamation from King George V was read by the then Mayor of Berlin, William. H. Schmalz, proclaiming Berlin a city. There was a week long celebration of festivities taking place to celebrate the cityhood. By 1912 there were over one hundred industries and Berlin was the first city in Canada to manufacture furniture. It was also the centre for the tanning, shirts, button, collars, and felt industries.
The City of Kitchener Council on June 10 1912 was – Mayor W. H. Schmalz with council members: J.R. Schilling, J. H. Schnarr, J. S. Schwartz, W. V. Uttley, J. Winterhalt, G. G. Bucher, D. Gross, E. W. Clement, C. B. Dunke, W. D. Euler, H. A. Hagen, W. O. Knechtel, C. Kranz, N. B. Detweiler, W. Pieper, and C. H. Mills. Mayor Schmalz also designed the coat of arms for the city.

     In 1916, the name Berlin was changed to Kitchener.  The City was incorporated on July 3, 1916, with the official name change taking place on September 1, 1916.  The mayor at the time of the name change was J. E. Hett with members of council: W. G. Cleghorn, C.B. Dunke, F. K. Ferguson, W. E. Gallagher, D. Gross, C. C. Hahn, J. Hessenauer, H. Hymmen, I. Master, J. Reid, A. E. Rudell, J. H. Schnarr, J. S. Schwartz, J. J. Walters and G. E. Zettel.

Berlin/Kitchener has been a growing and thriving community for over 160 years.

Founding families continue to raise families, original companies continue to exist, original schools are still standing and used by students.

      The City of Kitchener is celebrating 100 years as a City in 2012.  Many celebrations will be happening from June 9 2012 until the end of the year to celebrate is occasion.

The fonds consists of photographs, maps and textual background and correspondence on Kitchener.

1: Historical Information– 1800-2012. - 2m, 34 cm textual records.

This series contains information and photographs regarding the history of the city. Also includes more current city information.

An index is available in Appendix A.

2: Photographs. – 1857-2004. - 40 cm

This series consists of photographs of Berlin and Kitchener including people, landscapes.

An index is available in Appendix B.

3: Maps. – 1856-2004. - 50 cm

This series consists of maps of Berlin and Kitchener including parks. Includes heritage properties drawings and registered plans.

An index is available in Appendix C.

4: Artifacts. – 1910-1954. - 40 cm

This series consists of a Conestoga Wagon, the city seal and signs.

An index is available in Appendix D.

APPENDIX A
Series 1: Historical Information

Title Date Volume/Item Box
The Story of Kitchener 2-1 10946
Robert Sutherland 3-1 10937
125th Anniversary of Berlin 1979 3-2 10937
Background on Hibner Park 1979 3-3 10937
Skating tickets 1900’s 3-4 10937
Iron Horse Trail 1997 3-5 10937
Official Plan 1953-1995 3-6 10937
Kitchener Information 1965-1996 3-7 10937
Planning Dept. Scrapbook 1962-1963 4-1 10949
Planning Dept. Scrapbook 1963-1964 4-2 10949
Planning Dept. Scrapbook 1966 4-3 10949
Planning Dept. Scrapbook 1966 4-4 10949
Planning Dept. Scrapbook 1972 4-5 10949
Annexation of Kitchener 1968-1972 5-1 10945
Official Plan 1975 5-2 10945
General History 1971-1975 6-1 11095
Information on People and Companies 1980-1981 6-2 11095
Data Manuals 1946-2009 7-1 11153
Street Guide 2000 8-1 10933
Postcards 1800-1925 9-1 10927
Newspaper Articles 1970’s -1980’s 9-2 10927
History 1936-1950’s 9-3 10927
Clock Tower 1995 9-4 10927
Kitchener 1965 1965 9-5 10927
Centennial Information 1954 10-1 11454
Entering the Millennium 1999 10-2 11454
Newspaper Articles 10-4 11454
Victoria Park Neighbourhood Plan 1989 10-5 11454
Crest and Seal 11-1 10911
Date stones 11-2 10911
Logos 11-3 10911
Clock Tower 11-4 10911
Lips Park 2004 11-5 10911
Facts & Figures 1980’s 11-6 10911
World War Two certificates 1930’s 11-7 10911
Twin City Directory & Official Guide of the Towns of Berlin and Waterloo 1907 1907 12-1 10907
Kitchener History 1954 12-2 10907
Conservation District Plans 12-3 10907
Recollections of 125 Years 1979 13-1 10908
Kitchener Profile 13-2 10908
Scrapbooks (9) 1971-1988 14-1 10903
Scrapbooks (6) 1972-1987 15-1 10902
Scrapbooks (5) 1970-1975 16-1 10901
Newspaper Articles 1993 18-1 10906
Publication 1952 18-2 10906
Promotional Packages n.d. 18-3 10906
Amalgamation 1955-1979 19-1 10171
Kitchener Logo n.d. 20-1 10168
Journal of the Town Planning Institute 1925-1928 20-3 10168
Herman Quirmbach 1900-1981 20-5 10168
H. M. C. S. Kitchener n.d. 20-6 10168
“A History of Kitchener” book 1937 21-1 10358
City of Talent: Kitchener Centennial manual 1954 21-3 10358
Demographic Trends 1996-1997 22-1 10165
Newspaper Clippings 1940’s – 1960’s 24-1 10143
Newspaper Clippings 1970’s-1990’s 24-2 10143
Newspaper Clippings 1960’s- 1990’s 25-1 10158
Kitchener 125th Anniversary Edition 1979 26-1 10124
William Lyon MacKenzie King 27-1 10141
Jacob Shantz 1989 27-2 10141
Kitchener’s 125th Anniversary 1979 28-1 10140
Promotional Brochures 1995 28-2 10140
“Sauerkraut and Enterprise” book 1966 30-1 12005
“Caring on the Grand: a history of the Freeport Hospital” book 1987 30-2 12005
Official Plan Review Guest Book 1992 30-4 12005
“Builders & Boosters, Kitchener Chamber of Commerce 100th Anniversary 1886 30-3 12005
Street Guide 1993-2000 32-1 10861
Scrapbooks 1960’s 34-1 11160
Scrapbooks 1957-1968 35-1 11161
Scrapbooks (3) 1961-1966 36-1 11187
Industrial Commission 1950’s 37-1 11190
Downtown Historical Info 1960’s 38-1 11191
Historic Background Info 1800’s-2000’s 38-2 11191
Background Information 42-1 11248
Articles on neighbourhoods in Kitchener 44-1 12264
Regional Museums 45-1 12458
Kitchener History 45-2 12458
People of Kitchener 46-1 12418
Photo Perspective 47-1 12419
Background Information 1950’s 49-1 11150
Incorporation/proclamation documentation 1852-1912 53-1 12593
Name change information 1916 53-2 12593
Proclamation to be County Seat 53-3 12593
Proclamation to Village of Berlin 1853 53-4 12593
Wards of Berlin 53-5 12593
Name Change 1916 53-6 12593
Official Plan 1800-1972 54-1 13392
Lord Kitchener Visit 1995 56-1 12855
Royal/Political Visit 1959-1980 56-2 12855
Flags/Banners 1954-2000 58-1 14191
150th Anniversary Flag 2004 59-1 14278
Name Change Information 77-1 13305
Berlin Celebration of Cityhood 1912 1912 79-1 12995
Preston & Berlin Railway 1908 80-1 13067
Lord Kitchener 82-1 11195
Scrapbooks 2004-2005 83-1 13456
Scrapbooks 2003 84-1 13517
Scrapbooks 2004 85-1 13519
Scrapbooks 2005 86-1 13457
Scrapbooks 2002 87-1 13458
Wills/Financial Records 1903-1916 95-1 10943
Background Information 1973-1991 95-2 10943
New Kitchener Logo 2002 104-1 10137
Promotional Material n.d. 105-1 12002
Creating a Sense of Place 1998-2000 106-1 11176
New Logo n.d. 107-1 10811
Edge Booklet 2006 108-1 11143
City of Kitchener Atlas 2001-2006 110-1 10725
Book – Lord Kitchener The Great Boer War 111-1 11249
Your Kitchener 2002-2006 150-1 10928
Cultural Strategic Plan Terms of Reference n.d. 152-1 10913
Birth & Death
Register 1933-1958 153-1 11170
Birth & Death Register 1987 154-1 9994
Lord Kitchener 2005 155-1 11142
Licensing Information 1988-1999 156-1 11778
People Plan 2003-2008 157-1 12102
Quality of Life report findings 2003 157-2 12102
Annual Report to Citizens 2005-2007 158-1 12544
Strategic Plan 2009 158-2 12544
Community Strategic Plan 2007 158-3 12544
Your Kitchener 2007-2012 159-1 12110
Culture Plan II 2004 160-1 10169
Publication directories 1971-2006 161-1 12992
Vital Statistics 1935-1995 168-1 13599
Council Member condolence letter 1954 169-2 13704
Copy letter in 1924 City Hall cornerstone 1924 169-3 13704
Cityhood Celebration 2012 170-1 13706
Heritage Room Mural 1993 170-2 13706
Cityhood website pages 2012 170-3 13706
Kitchener’s Century Celebration 1912-2012 2012 170-4 13706

APPENDIX B
Series 2: Photographs

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Old Post Office
King a Benton (negatives) n.d. 1-1 10948
161 Queen St. S. (negatives) n.d. 1-2 10948
Photo Album 1948-1968 1-3 10948
Photo Album 1951-1957 1-4 10948
Queen St. Streetscapes n.d. 1-5 10948
Twin Cities Industrial League Champions 1935 11-6 10911
Historical Photos (copies) 1800’s 13-3 10908
Photographs 1950’s 20-2 10168
Photo Council Chambers 1909 21-2 10358
Aerial Photos 1950’s – 1991 23-1 10164
William Lyon MacKenzie King 1999 28-3 10140
Photographs 1950’s 40-1 10925
Photographs 1800’s-1950’s 43-1 11862
Postcard 1900’s 47-2 12419
King St. 1930’s 47-3 12419
Photograph 1950’s 47-4 12419
Photographs 1980’s-1990’s 48-1 12284
Aerial Photographs 1999 57-1 14166
Aerial Photographs 1990’s 78-1 11843
Aerial Photographs 1960’s 81-1 13878
Photographs 1980’s 90-1 12419
Photographs 1980’s 91-1 13512
Photographs 1980’s 92-1 13521
Photographs 1980’s 93-1 13523
Photographs 1995-2004 94-2 13592
Heritage Properties 1982-1999 98-1 10915
Heritage Properties 1982 99-1 11291
Heritage Properties 1982 100-1 10914
Victoria School Teams 1923-1924 102-1 10909
Kitchener Downtown 1983-1984 103-1 10925
Lord Kitchener n.d. 111-2 11249
Downtown Kitchener 1930’s 112-1 10925
Victoria School class 1933 149-1 11192
Lord Kitchener 1995 151-1 10919
W. H. Schmalz – painting 1930 156-2 11778
Various family photographs (Gartung) 1800’s 164-1 12997
Goudie Family photographs 1931-1946 164-2 12997
Rugby Team 1953-1955 165-1 12458
Sod Turning (City Hall) 1920-1923 169-1 13704

APPENDIX C
Series 3: Maps

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Planning Map 1979 5-3 10945
Map “The Unique Centre of the Fascinating Grand River Valley” 1950’s 9-6 10927
Plan of Subdivision of Parts of Lots Nos. 6, 7 & 8 in Jacob Hoffman's Survey, City of Berlin (copy) 1915 10-3 11454
Aerial Drawing of Berlin 1897 10-6 11454
Map of Berlin 1892 17-1 P1
1912 City of Berlin 1912 17-2 P1
Town Planning Map 1925 20-4 10168
A copy of a plan of the Town of Berlin in the Township and County of Waterloo, C.W., 1857-58. 1857-1858 29-1 11097
Demographic Maps 1970’s 33-1 CH 13007
Berlin Maps 1879-1914 33-2 CH
Historic Maps 1916-1924 33-3 CH
Staging of Development Maps 1974 33-4 CH
Annexation Maps 1879-1992 33-5 CH
Street Map 2002 39-1 11683
Town of Berlin 1892 41-1 P1
Aerial Maps 1995 51-1 P1 9390
Topographic Maps 1995 52-1 P1
Registered Plans 1900’s-1950’s 55-1 P1
Heritage Building Drawings 60-1 14727
Heritage Building Drawings 61-1 14728
Heritage Building Drawings 62-1 14726
Heritage Building Drawings 63-1 9497
Heritage Building Drawings 64-1 9499
Heritage Building Drawings 65-1 9706
Heritage Building Drawings 62-1 10513
Heritage Building Drawings 63-1 10493
Heritage Building Drawings 66-1 10399
Heritage Building Drawings 67-1 10390
Heritage Building Drawings 68-1 9494
Heritage Building Drawings 69-1 9492
Heritage Building Drawings 70-1 9493
Heritage Building Drawings 71-1 9496
Heritage Building Drawings 72-1 11701
Heritage Building Drawings 73-1 13459
Heritage Building Drawings 74-1 13460
Heritage Building Drawings 75-1 13461
Heritage Building Drawings 76-1 13497
Book of Street Maps 1900’s-2000’s 88-1 13588
Park Maps 89-1 CH
Maps 1908-1997 101-1 CH
Reference Plans 1971-1974 113-1 11051
Reference Plans 1974-1977 114-1 9910
Reference Plans 1997-2004 115-1 9985
Reference Plans 1994-1997 116-1 11694
Reference Plans 1992-1993 117-1 11695
Reference Plans 1989-1992 118-1 10095
Reference Plans 1987-1989 119-1 9977
Reference Plans 1986-1987 120-1 10099
Reference Plans 1983-1986 121-1 10204
Reference Plans 1980-1983 122-1 13708
Reference Plans 1977-1980 123-1 11696
Expropriation Plans 1984-1989 124-1 11697
Waterloo Descriptive Plans 1970’s 125-1 11698
Maps – Property Ownership 1967 126-1 P1
Maps - Demographics 1961-1995 127-1 P1
Maps – Village of Grand Hill 1959 128-1 CH
Maps – Village of Doon 1857-1881 129-1 CH
Maps – Village of Bridgeport 1856-1974 130-1 CH
Maps – City of Berlin Zoning 1879-1914 131-1 P1
Maps – City of Berlin 1919 132-1 CH
Maps - Historic 1916-1986 133-1 CH
Maps – Election 1972-1988 134-1 CH, P1
Maps – Township of Waterloo 1883-1959 135-1 CH, P1
Maps - Assessment 1992 136-1 P1
Maps – Wards 1979-1990 137-1 P1
Maps – Staging of Development 1972-1975 138-1 CH
Maps – Official Plans 1992-1995 139-1 P1
Maps - Zoning 1930-1994 140-1 CH, P1
Maps – Land Use 1962-1987 141-1 CH, P1
Maps – Aerial Mosaic & Aerial 1946-1992 142-1 CH, P1
Maps - Annexation 1879-1992 143-1 CH
Maps – Street 1964-1982 144-1 CH, P1
Maps – Service Station 145-1 CH
Maps – Project Proposal 1967-1987 146-1 CH, P1
Maps – Corporate Study 1955-1972 147-1 CH, P1
Maps - Topographic 1954-1981 148-1 CH, P1
Registry Building Plans 1938 162-1 CH
City Maps 1973-1999 166-1 P1 13013
City of Kitchener Maps 1908-1997 167-1 CH

APPENDIX D
Series 4: Artifacts

Title Date Volume/Item Box
City Seal 1916 31-1 CH
Auditorium Dedication Scroll 1951 50-1 Auditorium
Artifact (cast iron stove) 1910 96-1 storage
Wooden Nickels 1954 97-1 10138
Kitchener sign n.d. 109-1 11206
Conestoga Wagon 163-1 Mayor’s cabinet

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives

City of Kitchener - Public Utilities

  • Fonds
  • 1800 - 2013

With the advent of various utilities in the 19th century, the wave of change began and continues in the present day in the 21st century. It began in Berlin Ontario in the early years, when affluent home owners and progressive businesses converted to gas. In the late 1880’s horse drawn streetcars were the beginning of a public transit system.

Gas

Gas power was first introduced in Berlin in 1879, when Dominion Buttons Company, installed the first gas-lighting system. A few years later, the privately owned Berlin Gas Company, built a coal-burning plant on Gaukel Street to produce flammable gas. The Town installed street lights and several companies and households converted to gas. When the owners of the company wanted to sell, Berlin was willing to purchase the gas company as it had previously purchased the water company in 1898. The Town of Berlin took over running the Berlin Gas Company on June 1, 1903. The Berlin Light Commission was set up and gas and electric customers were served by the Commission. The commission began upgrading the utility’s system to provide a more reliable system to its customers.

In 1920, the Kitchener Light Commission opened a modern gas production facility which was known as a carbureted water gas production plant. The new system ensured customers had a regular supply of gas.

The gas plant was enlarged and upgraded in 1930. Architect B. A. Jones designed, the Kitchener Public Utilities Commission building which became the base for the gas, electric and transit operations. The stately art deco building built in the same style as the former City Hall, opened in 1933 and still stands today at the corner of Gaukel and King Streets.

During the 1950’s, natural gas was moving east with the installation of the TransCanada pipeline. Many miles of new pipelines were laid in Kitchener to accommodate the use of natural gas. In 1958, natural gas was distributed to Kitchener customers and the old manufactured gas plant on Gaukel St. was dismantled.

With the introduction of Regional government in 1973, gas distribution was no longer under the Kitchener Public Utilities Commission. Gas distribution became a division of the City of Kitchener under the name Kitchener Utilities. In 2003, Kitchener Utilities celebrated 100 years of Community Ownership. Today, Kitchener Utilities is a publicly owned utility which delivers natural gas and water to its citizens and maintains the city’s’ underground system of pumps, valves and pipes. Kitchener Utilities offers programs to help increase energy efficiency such as natural gas heater rentals, protection plans, financing and repair services on appliances.

Public Transit

The privately owned, Berlin Gas Company began running horse drawn streetcars in Berlin in 1887. June 13, 1889, the first street car ran between Waterloo and Berlin. From 1894 - 1906, the Berlin Street Railway began operating electric streetcars in replace of the horse drawn streetcars. The single car line that ran from Cedar Street (Bridgeport Rd.) in Waterloo to Scott Street in Berlin was extended to Albert Street (now Madison) where a new car barn and power house was built. In 1895, new electric cars were run. In 1902, service was extended to Bridgeport (which later annexed and became part of Kitchener), by the Berlin & Bridgeport Railway Company. The Berlin Light Commission took over the operation of the street railway system in 1907. In 1910, hydro-electric power from Niagara Falls was turned on in Berlin and on April 1, 1911 hydroelectric power was used for the street railway.

In 1922, the first centre-exit steel cars were purchased. Gasoline powered buses provided cross town bus service beginning in 1939 run by the Public Utilities Commission. On December 27, 1946, 59 years after streetcar service began, a severe ice storm damaged to overhead wire, which caused the service to end a few days prematurely as repairs could not be justified when trolley service was to begin on January 1, 1947 using the new overhead electric lines. A new terminal building and operations base was erected in 1951 on King St. E. In 1967 the first diesel-powered buses were purchased. An exact cash fare system was implemented in 1971.

With the advent of Regional Government in 1973, the City of Kitchener took over the running of the transit system from the Public Utilities Commission under the name Kitchener Transit. New larger buses were purchased to replace the trolley buses which ended their reign on March 26, 1973. In the mid 1970’s, more large buses were purchased to replace the smaller buses as they were phased out. A central transit terminal opened in 1974 on Duke Street and a new transit centre on Strasburg Rd. opened in 1976. By 1998 there were a fleet of 116 buses. The computer age arrived in 1982 with the introduction of Teleride, a computer system that allowed customers to phone the bus stop number and the computer system would inform them when the next bus was expected. The current transit terminal on Charles St. opened in 1988. Kitchener Transit merged with Cambridge Transit on January 1, 2000 becoming the newly created Grand River Transit (GRT) under the Region of Waterloo.

Electricity

In 1882, the Berlin Gas Company, a private firm, built a coal-burning plant on Gaukel Street to produce electricity. In 1903, the privately owned plant was taken over by the town. The founding fathers of Hydro in Ontario were Adam Beck, Daniel Snider and Elias Detweiler. These men believed that hydro-electric power would provide the least expensive power source which would support growth and prosperity in their community. They promoted electricity from Niagara Falls throughout southwestern Ontario.

The Hydro-Electric Power Commission was founded in 1906 to build transmission lines to supply municipalities with power generated at Niagara Falls. It was a crown corporation and municipal cooperative and the first public-owned utility. The first chairman for the commission was Sir Adam Beck who was born in Baden Ontario, near Kitchener. He passionately believed that electricity should be made available and affordable for everyone not just the wealthy. Sir Adam Beck was on hand on October 11, 1910 when he turned on the switch to make Berlin the first town to receive hydro-electric power generated at Niagara Falls.

Electricity for Berliners was distributed by the Berlin Light Commission from 1906-1916 and the Kitchener Light Commission from 1917-1924. In 1925 the Public Utilities Commission took over the distribution. A new office building for the commission opened in 1933 and still stands today. The building was a three-storey Art Deco building constructed with cut granite and sandstone, in the same style of the former City Hall.

In 1978, the commission became the Hydro-Electric Commission of Kitchener – Wilmot and was incorporated in 2000. The current hydro headquarters was erected in 1985, with additions built in 1995 and 2004.

This fonds consist of correspondence, historical information, blueprints, committee minutes, agreements, annual reports, financial information, contracts, photographs, videos, and drawings. The records consist of six series.

    Title based on contents of fonds.

1: Correspondence/Historical information – 1888 – 2011. 166cm

This series consists of correspondence, reports, agreements, contracts, insurance policies, and registers.

An index is available in Appendix A.

2: Financial Information – 1908 – 1973. 70cm

This series consists of ledgers, financial statements, and financial information.

An index is available in Appendix B.

3: Committee Minutes – 1886 – 1961. 117cm

This series consists of minutes of standing committees and special committees.

An index is available in Appendix C.

4: Blueprints/Drawings – 1918 – 1995. 16cm

This series consists of blueprints and drawings of facilities and Public Utilities Commission building.

An index is available in Appendix D.

5: Photographs/Videos/Film – 1908 – 1991. 17cm

This series consists of photographs, videos and film of the Public Utilities Commission and Transportation Centre.

An index is available in Appendix E.

6: Annual Reports – 1910 – 1995. 14cm

This series consists of annual reports of the Utilities, Transportation and Railway of the City of Kitchener.

An index is available in Appendix F.

7 : Artifacts – 1800 – 2002. 60cm

    This series consists of ‘The Evolution of the Meter’ artifacts.

An index is available in Appendix G.

Appendix A
Series 1: Correspondence

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Correspondence 1966 1-3 9907
Canadian Transit Association brief 1961 1-4 9907
Public Utilities Commission files 1967-1969 1-5 9907
P. U. C., Gas Division operation review 1905 1-6 9907
Kitchener & Waterloo Street Railway Ledger(fuel needs) 1930-1954 1-7 9907
Kitchener & Waterloo Street Railway Ledger (maintenance) 1928-1933 1-8 9907
Proceedings of American Transit Assoc. 1948 2-1 9908
Proceedings of Canadian Electric Railway Assoc. 1921-1956 2-3 9908
Agreements of P.U.C. 1957-1966 3-1 9913
Construction Contract – Natural Gas Pipeline 1958-1967 3-2 9913
Proposal for Specifications – P.U. C. 1958 3-3 9913
Report – Gas Department 1957 3-4 9913
Operating and Maintenance Procedures 1961-1970 3-5 9913
Gas System Changeover Report 1958 3-6 9913
Miscellaneous 1916-1924 3-7 9913
Correspondence 1912-1924 3-8 9913
Proposals 1913-1924 3-9 9913
Contracts 1912-1924 3-10 9913
Gas Dept. Insurance Policies 1962-1970 3-11 9913
American Gas Assoc. Gas Industry Training Directory 1972 4-1 9915
Proceedings National Conference 1970 4-2 9915
Kitchener Utilities 100 years 2006 4-4 9915
Public Transit Studies 1971-1972 4-5 9915
Transit 1894-1922 4-9 9915
Waterloo Transportation Franchise Agreement 1971 4-10 9915
Correspondence 1961-1971 4-11 9915
Miscellaneous 1959-1966 4-12 9915
Coach Line Material & Care Equipment Brochure n.d. 4-14 9915
Correspondence Trolley Line 1966-1971 4-15 9915
Bus Schedule 1962 4-16 9915
Transportation Peter Barnard Study 1971-1972 5-1 9917
Union Agreements 1944-1971 5-2 9917
Agreement – City of Waterloo & P.U.C. 1946-1971 5-4 9917
Transportation Special Reports 1968-1972 5-5 9917
Miscellaneous 1954-1972 5-7 9917
Transportation Department Monthly reports 1954-1964 5-8 9917
Transportation Department Insurance Policies 1958-1975 5-9 9917
Miscellaneous 1918-1924 5-10 9917
B.F. Goodrich Gas Agreement 1960-1970 6-1 9919
Gas Department Monthly Reports 1954-1968 6-2 9919
P.U.C. history 1958-1969 6-3 9919
Agreements 1929-1953 6-4 9919
Union Gas Company 1954-1972 6-5 9919
Natural Gas 1955-1958 6-6 9919
Ontario Fuel Board 1954-1962 6-9 9919
Trans-Canada Pipe Lines 1951-1955 6-11 9919
Miscellaneous 1957-1968 6-14 9919
Miscellaneous Gas Reports 1968-1973 6-15 9919
Gas Department Information 1945-1968 6-16 9919
St. Mary’s General Hospital Gas Sales Contract 1970-1972 6-18 9919
B & W Heat Treating Co. 1966-1970 6-19 9919
Waterloo Public Utilities Commission 1957-1958 6-20 9919
Agreement Ontario Natural Gas Storage and Pipelines Ltd. 1957 6-22 9919
Annual Statements Gas Department 1929-1972 6-23 9919
Newspaper Article - Transit 1976 7-1 14267
Coach Material 1945-1959 12-1 12729
Textual Material 1907-1918 14-1 12721
Gas Department Work Order Summary 1948-1972 16-1 12748
Work Order Summary – Bus Department 1942-1969 20-1 12744
Kitchener Wilmot Hydro history 1915-1967 7-2 14267
Kitchener Utilities history 2003-2011 7-3 14267
Pumping Register 1888-1898 33-1 13606
Ontario Hydro History 1956-1998 7-4 14267
Kitchener Gas Works 1906 34-1 11193
Berlin & Waterloo/Wellington Street Railway By-Laws 1888-1947 36-1 14075
Agreements 1907-1987 37-1 8118
Transit/Terminal data/studies/options 1980-1990 78-1 12598
Transit Mall/Terminal studies 1978-1993 79-1 12610
Plans – Downtown Transportation Centre 1983-10987 80-1 8098
Newspaper Articles 1988-1994 81-1 10934
P.U.C. Building Administration 1984-1987 7-5 14267

Appendix B
Series 2: Financial Information

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Billing book for transportation 1962-1969 1-1 9907
Gas accounts receivable 1967-1968 1-2 9907
Miscellaneous 1946-1969 4-3 9915
Bank Statements 1961-1973 4-6 9915
Debentures 1964-1972 4-7 9915
Financial Statements (Gas and Transportation) 1947-1972 4-8 9915
Financial Information P.U.C. 1962 4-13 9915
Union Gas Company 1954-1966 6-6 9919
Natural Gas 1955-1958 6-7 9919
Ontario Fuel Board 1954-1962 6-8 9919
Gas Budget 1970 6-10 9919
Gas 1913 6-12 9919
Miscellaneous 1957-1968 6-13 9919
Gas Department 1965-1969 6-21 9919
Transportation Department Ledger 1946-1973 8-1 12703
Ledger – Bus Division 1970-1972 9-1 12711
Railway Ledger 1917-1925 10-1 12716
Transportation Department Ledger 1967-1972 11-1 12701
Street Railway Ledger 1942-1947 13-1 12708
Berlin & Waterloo Street Railway Ledger 1914-1923 15-1 12726
Gas Department Ledger 1942-1973 17-1 12738
Cash Voucher Ledger -Transportation 1924-1965 18-1 12747
Gas Department Transfer Ledger 1942-1970 19-1 12741
Street Railway Ledger 1921-1941 21-1 12727
Transfer Ledger- Street Railway Department 1919-1939 22-1 12733
Berlin Light Commission Ledger- Gas Department 1913-1915 23-1 12714
Berlin Light Commission Ledger – Street Railway Department 1919-1924 24-1 12707
Berlin Light Commission Daybook Ledger – Street Railway Department 1919-1923 25-1 12713
Berlin Light Commission Daybook Ledger – Street Railway Department 1923-1929 26-1 12706
Berlin Light Commission Daybook Ledger- Street Railway Department 1908-1914 27-1 12712
Transportation Transfer Ledger 1947-1970 28-1 12745
Journal of the Town Planning Institute 1909-1919 32-1 13511

Appendix C
Series 3: Committee Minutes

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Minutes of Standing Committees 1911-1912 38-1 10127
Minutes of Standing Committees 1913-1914 39-1 11060
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1915-1916 40-1 11058
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1917-1918 41-1 11056
Railway and Traffic Committees 1917-1941 42-1 11054
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1919-1922 43-1 11057
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1922-1923 44-1 11055
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1924-1925 45-1 11053
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1926-1927 46-1 13000
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1928-1929 47-1 12096
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1930-1931 48-1 12092
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1932-1933 49-1 12090
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1934-1935 50-1 12097
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1936-1937 51-1 12093
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1938-1939 52-1 12089
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1940-1941 53-1 12086
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1942-1943 54-1 12082
Railway & Traffic Committees 1942-1949 55-1 12078
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1944-1945 56-1 12076
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1946-1947 57-1 12083
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1948-1949 58-1 12079
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1950-1951 59-1 12077
Railway and Traffic Committees 1950-1952 60-1 12074
Standing Committee Minutes & Reports 1952 61-1 12072
Fire & Light and Railway & Traffic Committees 1953 62-1 12070
Fire & Light and Railway & Traffic Committees 1954 63-1 12066
Fire & Light and Railway & Traffic Committees 1955 64-1 12062
Railway & Traffic Committees 1955-1958 65-1 12073
Fire & Light and Railway & Traffic Committees 1956 66-1 12069
Fire & Light and Railway & Traffic Committees 1957 67-1 12063
Fire & Light Committees 1958 68-1 12061
Railway & Traffic Committees 1959 69-1 12056
Fire & Light Committees 1959 70-1 12054
Fire & Light Committees 1960 71-1 12050
Railway & Traffic Committees 1960 72-1 12048
Fire & Light Committees 1961 73-1 12057
Railway & Traffic Committees 1961 74-1 12055
Berlin Fire & Water – Minutes & Reports 1886-1911 75-1 12051
Berlin Fire & Light Committee Minutes 1900-1908 76-1 12036

Appendix D
Series 4: Blueprints/Drawings

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Blueprints 1918-1924 5-11 9917
Gas Department Information 1945-1968 6-17 9919
Public Utilities Commission Building 1932-1961 29-1 11447
Facility Drawings 1946 35-1 13889

Appendix E
Series 5: Photographs/Videos/Film

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Official Opening Kitchener Wilmot Hydro 1984 7-6 14267
P.U.C. film 1946-1953 31-1 13442
Hydro photograph n.d. 7-7 14267
Acrylic reproduction on marble – Preston & Berlin Railway 1908 77-1 13067
Concept Photographs 1983-1985 78-2 12598
Transit Mall photographs 1984-1991 79-2 12610
Hydro Commission 1998-2000 7-8 14267
Vandalism 1976 7-9 14267
Pencil drawing Water Tower 2010 7-10 14267

Appendix F
Series 6: Annual Reports

Title Date Volume/Item Box
Berlin and Waterloo Street Railway 1910-1915 1-9 9907
Kitchener and Waterloo Street Railway 1916-1920 1-10 9907
Committees & Canadian Transit Assoc. 1948 2-2 9908
Transportation Annual Statements 1940-1972 5-3 9917
Transportation 1970-1972 5-6 9917
Annual Report – Public Works Department 1995 30-1 14387

Appendix G
Series 7: Artifacts

Title Date Volume/Item Box
The Evolution of the Water Meter – 5/8 Leeds Imperial Meter 82-1 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – manual of meter testing 82-2 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – 5/8 Kent Norlantic Meter 1950’s 82-3 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter –1/2 Leeds Imperial Meter 1948 82-4 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – 5/8 Trident Imperial Meter 1800 82-5 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – Trident Imperial Meter 1894 82-6 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – 5/8 Trident Imperial Meter 1897 82-7 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – Neptune Trident 8 Imperial Meter 1970 82-8 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – Neptune Trident Seal Imperial Meter 1970 82-9 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – Rockwell Imperial Meter 1970 82-10 KOF
The Evolution of the Water Meter – APB Metric Meter 2002 82-11 KOF

City of Kitchener Corporate Archives