Alma College International Alumnae Association

Identity area

Type of entity

Corporate body

Authorized form of name

Alma College International Alumnae Association

Parallel form(s) of name

Standardized form(s) of name according to other rules

Other form(s) of name

Identifiers for corporate bodies

Description area

Dates of existence

History

The Alma Daughters Society was organized by Emma Sisk in February 1901. The organization included past female teachers and students who were united by their interest in continuing to support college fellowship. The association quickly became known as the “Alumnae Association” and worked to support the college through a variety of special events, gifts and fund-raising. In 1908 the charter of the school was amended to provide for the organization of ex-students known as “Alma Daughters”. This organization received the right to elect three members each year, for a term of one year, to the Alma College Board of Management. The original name "Alma Daughters" was changed to "Alma College Alumnae" in 1931 to reflect the growth of the association. The alumnae were divided into geographical chapters primarily within Ontario. Throughout the years international chapters were added. For example, in 1998 a Bermudian chapter was added at the annual reunion in Bermuda. Semi-annual and annual meetings were held each year in addition to monthly chapter meetings and social events. At the 1994 Alumnae Semi-Annual Meeting, in anticipation of the planned reopening of Alma College as a co-educational institution, the members voted to change their name to the "Alma College Alumni" to include future male members. However, after the college did not reopen the members decided that they wished to be known once again as "Alumnae". In January 1995, at the Semi-Annual Meeting the name, "Alma College International Alumnae Association", was adopted to reflect both the international aspect and uniqueness of the all female association. The association continues to operate today.

Places

Legal status

Functions, occupations and activities

Mandates/sources of authority

Internal structures/genealogy

General context

Relationships area

Access points area

Subject access points

Place access points

Occupations

Control area

Authority record identifier

Institution identifier

Rules and/or conventions used

Status

Level of detail

Dates of creation, revision and deletion

Language(s)

Script(s)

Sources

Maintenance notes

  • Clipboard

  • Export

  • EAC

Related subjects

Related places