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People and organizations
Architecture

Durand and Moore Architects

  • Corporate body
  • c1882 - 1888

Durand then partnered with architect John M. Moore. In 1888, a legal dispute between Durand and Moore dissolved their partnership.

Durand, George F.

  • Person
  • 1850 - 1889

George F. Durand was born in 1850 to James Durand, a building and contracting business owner in London, Ontario. Noticing his son’s artistic ability, James Durand wrote to sculptor and drawing teacher J.R. Peel in 1964 arranging for his son to enroll at Peel’s school. In the late 1860s, Durand articled for architect William Robinson where he met his friend and future partner Thomas Tracy. After his apprenticeship, he was hired by Thomas Fuller to work on the New York State Capital building in Albany, New York. The project became embroiled in scandal when the cost of the building ballooned to well over the original projected cost. As a result of the controversy, Fuller was dismissed which led to Durand leaving the project as well. His experience in New York lasted from 1870 to 1876.
Durand returned to London and formed a partnership with Robinson and Tracy in 1878. In 1880, Robinson left and Tracy and Durand worked as partners. This partnership lasted until Tracy became city engineer and Durand then partnered with architect John M. Moore. In 1888, a legal dispute between Durand and Moore dissolved their partnership. In 1889, Durand began to take large lengths of time off work due to illness and on December 20th of that year he passed away.

Gillan, Charles H.

  • Person
  • 1911 - 1980

Charles Hansen Gillin was born in Winnipeg, Manitoba in February of 1911 to Hugh Clement Gillin and Margaret Hansen. After Hugh’s death, Margaret married Patrick J.Malloy. Gillin had one sister, Marnie Hubbs-Gillin; four half-brothers, Alexander Molloy, Patrick Malloy, Peter Malloy and John (Jack) Malloy and a foster brother, Gerald Giba. He attended Kelvin Technical High School in Winnipeg and later graduated with a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Manitoba in 1936. Gillin began his career as an architect with Green, Blankstein, Russel and Ham and eventually moved to Ottawa where he met his wife Madeleine Belanger. In 1943 he joined the Royal Canadian Engineers and trained as an officer, but did not serve overseas. In 1946 he moved to London, Ontario and began working for the engineering firm, M.M. Dillon and Co. In 1948 he opened his own office, Charles H. Gillin Architect, BArch MRAIC, at 389 Queens Avenue in London. As an architect in London, Gillin worked on several projects for the Separate School Board taking a role in the design and building of many of London’s Catholic schools including Catholic Central High School. Gillin also designed private residences, including the heritage listed Ginsberg residence in London; public buildings, including the Southwest Middlesex Health Centre in Mount Brydges and the club house at the Highland Country Club in London. His advocacy of the contemporary modernist style of architecture can be seen in all of these projects. Gillin and his wife had five children and lived in a house on Cathcart Street in London, which Gillinde signed himself. He was a member of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, the Ontario Association of Architects and the London Society of Architects. Gillin was also a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Highland Golf Club. He died on September 23, 1980 at St. Joseph’s Hospital in London, Ontario.

Robinson, Tracy, Durand and Co.

  • Corporate body
  • 1878-1880

In the late 1860s, Durand articled for architect William Robinson where he met his friend and future partner Thomas Tracy. Durand returned to London and formed a partnership with Robinson and Tracy in 1878.

Tracy and Durand Architects

  • Corporate body
  • 1880 - 1882

In 1880, Robinson left and Tracy and Durand worked as partners. This partnership lasted until Tracy became city engineer.