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People and organizations

Russell, Olive Ruth

  • Person
  • 1897-1979

Dr. Olive Ruth Russell was born in Delta, Ontario on July 9, 1897. She graduated from the University of Toronto in 1931 and from the University of Edinburgh in 1935 going on to teach at various schools and colleges from 1920 to 1942. During World War II, she served as a personnel selection officer with the Canadian Women's Army Corps, 1942-1945, attaining the rank of Captain. From 1945 to 1947 she was an executive assistant to the director general of the Rehabilitation Branch, Dept. of Veterans' Affairs.

Dr. Russell was a Canadian delegate to the Inter-continental Conference of the National Council of Women, 1946; a fraternal delegate from the World Federation of United Nations Associations to the Conference of the International Federation of University Women, 1947, and a member of the board, National Commission for Beneficient Euthanasia, U.S.A. She was Assistant Professor of Psychology, Winthrop College, S.C., 1947-1949, and Professor and Chairman of the Dept. of Psychology, Western Maryland College, 1949-1962. She authored Freedom to Die: Moral and Legal Aspects of Euthanasia (1975) and campaigned vigorously in favour of euthanasia. She was also the author of numerous articles on euthanasia, education and psychology.

Russell died on May 25, 1979 at her home in Chevy Chase, Maryland at the age of 81.
Dr. Russell was a Canadian delegate to the Inter-continental Conference of the National Council of Women, 1946; a fraternal delegate from the World Federation of United Nations Associations to the Conference of the International Federation of University Women, 1947, and a member of the board, National Commission for Beneficient Euthanasia, U.S.A. She was Assistant Professor of Psychology, Winthrop College, S.C., 1947-1949, and Professor and Chairman of the Dept. of Psychology, Western Maryland College, 1949-1962. She authored Freedom to Die: Moral and Legal Aspects of Euthanasia, 1975 and campaigned vigorously in favour of euthanasia. She was also the author of numerous articles on euthanasia, education and psychology.
(from Library and Archives Canada)

Gordon, Armistead Churchill

  • Person
  • 1855-1931

Armistead Churchill Gordon, lawyer and writer, was born December 20, 1855 in Virginia. Gordon attended the University of Virginia, and later studied law, being called to the bar in 1879. Involved in many aspects of higher education in Virginia he was a member of the Board of Visitors of the College of William & Mary and the University of Virginia, as well as being the first chairman of the Virginia State Library Board. Outside of his work in the law, he published multiple books on the history and peoples of Virginia, as well as collections of poetry.

Opie, Amelia

  • Person
  • 1769-1853

Amelia Alderson was an English Romantic author. Amelia was born November 12, 1769 in Norwich, England and married the painter John Opie in 1798. She was a radical thinker and involved in a circle that included John Horne Tooke and Mary Wollstonecraft. In 1801 Amelia published her first work under her name, "Father and Daughter," and subsequently wrote 25 more novels, biographies and volumes of verse. Amelia died in 1853.

The Sudbury Star

  • 023
  • Corporate body
  • 1909 - Present

The Sudbury Star first began publishing its newspaper on January 11, 1909, under the name the Daily Northern Star. Headed by publisher and editor George J. Ashworth, the Daily Northern Star was the first daily newspaper to be printed north of Toronto and focused on local events while still reporting on provincial, national, and international news. After only six months of operation, the newspaper encountered financial difficulties. William Edge Mason, a printing foreman in the mechanical department, sought financial assistance from ten prominent local men willing to donate $3,000 each to ensure the continuation of the operation. With their assistance, the newspaper was back on the streets within a month. By March 1910, the newspaper was renamed the Sudbury Daily Star. Later that year, financial support was again required, and the newspaper cut its publication down from six days a week to two and was renamed again the Sudbury Star. Following these financial setbacks, Ashworth resigned in 1911 and William Edge Mason became owner and publisher of the newspaper until his death in 1948. The newspaper became a three-times a week publication in 1935, and returned to daily status, six days a week, in September 1939. In 1992, Sunday publications first began, and the Sudbury Star published its newspaper seven days a week. This practice is continued today in both an online and paper format.

Newspaper editions of the Sudbury Star could be purchased individually or by subscription. Early subscribers could obtain editions of the newspaper by post or by telephoning the Sudbury Star which would then promptly deliver the newspaper. The first delivery career program for the Sudbury Star began September 3, 1940. The news careers, sometimes referred to as "newsboys" or "delivery career boys" consisted of many young boys who, during the early years, wore a white t-shirt with "The Sudbury Daily Star" printed on the front in blue lettering and carried the newspapers inside a thick delivery bag with a shoulder strap. The delivery careers were trained and each given a route by the Sudbury Star to deliver the newspaper daily to subscribers at work or at home. The routes included Sudbury, Copper Cliff, Creighton, Coniston, Garson and Falconbridge, Ontario. Eventually, young girls also became careers and the routes expanded to include all the communities which are now a part of Greater Sudbury.

Over the years, the Sudbury Star office has occupied numerous locations in downtown Sudbury. First located in the Gagne Block building on Elm Street, the office then moved into the Grand Theatre building (known as the Empire Theatre building after renovations in the late 1940’s and renamed the Grand Theatre by the 1980’s) at 24 Elgin Street. In 1916, the office moved to 18 Serpentine Street in Copper Cliff but returned to downtown by October of 1917, this time setting up in the Morin Building at 21-23 Elgin Street. In the early 1920’s, the Sudbury Star office moved back to the Gagne Block building at 22 Elm Street and the corner of Monck Street (now called Frood Road) where it remained for many years before finally setting up at 33 MacKenzie Street in 1961, where it resided until October 2013. The Sudbury Star’s office then moved to 198 Pine Street and in early 2020, relocated again to Suite 103, 888 Regent Street.

In addition to publishing its newspaper, the Sudbury Star also operated a printing company known as Sudbury Star Print (by 1929 known as Sudbury Star Printers and Publishers and then by 1940 as Sudbury Star Publishers Ltd). Beginning in the early 1910’s, they printed catalogues and various advertisements for local businesses in the Sudbury area. Later publications include the Real Estate Guide and special business anniversary publications.

Sudbury Star Owners:
• George J. Ashworth 1909-1911
• William Edge Mason 1911-1948
• W.E. Mason Estate 1948-1950
• J.R. Meakes 1950-1955
• Thomson Newspapers 1955-1988
• The Thomson Corporation 1989-2000
• Osprey Media LP 2001-2007
• Sun Media Corporation 2007-2015
• Postmedia Network Canada Corporation 2015-Present

Publisher and General Manager:
• George J. Ashworth 1909-1911
• William Edge Mason 1911-1948
• J.R. Meakes 1950-1975
• John Friesen 1975-1981
• Don R. Herron 1981-1986
• Maurice H. Switzer 1986-1992
• Jon C. Butler 1992-1995
• Ken Seguin 1995-2003
• Dan Johnson 2003-2004
• David Kilgour 2004-2009, 2013-2014
• Bruce Cowan 2009-2013
• Karsten Johansen 2014-Present

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