Showing 7305 results

People and organizations
Craig, Ernest
002 · Person · 1888 - 1960

Ernest Craig was born March 19, 1888 to Irish immigrant and laborer John Craig (1841-1921) and his wife Mary Neil (1861-1955) in Kearney, Ontario. By 1891, the Craig family was living on a farm in the Township of Perry, Ontario. The fourth of twelve children, Ernest Craig left school early and started working at the mining camps in eastern Canada. By the late 1910’s, Craig had reached the level of Mine Manager in Elk Lake, Ontario.

On September 10, 1918, Ernest Craig married Mary Rath (1883-1962) in Flinton, Ontario. The couple moved to Northern Ontario and had two children, Barbara Craig (1921-2013, aka Barbara Mather) and Donald Craig. During the 1920’s, Craig worked at King Kirkland Lake Mine (Forman in 1921, Manager in 1922) in the Township of Label, Ontario. He was also the Superintendent of Lebel-Oro property in 1923 and later he was in charge of the South Bay Power Plant in Gowganda, Ontario.

In 1928, Thayer Lindsley appointed Ernest Craig as the first General Manager of Falconbridge Nickel Mines. Craig helped develop both the new mining company and the new town. Within the first year and a half, the shaft was sunk to 1,000 feet with over 4,000 feet of underground tunnels. Sporting events flourished in Falconbridge with Craig’s support and Camp Falcona was created for the children of the employees.

In 1941, Ernest Craig with his brother Robert Craig (1895-1959) established the Craig Bit Company in North Bay, Ontario to mass-produce the “Craig Bit,” a detachable drill the brothers invented which tripled productivity in mines. Their company became North Bay’s second largest employer. During the Second World War, the Craig Bit Company also manufactured large shell components for the military.

In 1945, Ernest Craig retired from Falconbridge Mines Ltd. He moved to the Peterborough, Ontario area and became a consultant for Ventures Limited (the parent company of Falconbridge Mines). While in this capacity, he recommended the creation of a new mine in Nephton, Ontario. Craig became Vice-President and General Manager of American Nepheline and aided with their setup as a new mine. He also became President of manufacturers J.J. Turner & Sons Company Limited in Peterborough, Ontario.

In 1957, Craig retired from American Nepheline and moved with his wife to Toronto, Ontario. Ernest Craig passed away September 28, 1960 at the age of 72.

Cameron, Archie
002 · Person · 1919 - 1990

Archibald Ernest Cameron (aka Archie Cameron) was born in 1919 to Thomas Cameron and Isabelle Cameron of Massey, Ontario. He began working for Falconbridge Nickel Mines during the mid 1930's. From 1939 to 1942, Cameron photographed and created several silent films for the Department of Health Education. He also was a smelter worker for 18 years, retiring in 1952. During the Second World War, Cameron served as a Private for No. 14 Company Canadian Forestry Corps. He lived the remainder of his life in Garson, Ontario and passed away March 7, 1990 in Sudbury, Ontario.

Lindsley, Thayer
002 · Person · 1882 - 1976

Thayer Lindsley was born on August 17, 1882 in Yokohama, Japan to John Lindsley (1845-1909), a representative for the Canadian Pacific Railway in Japan, and Virginia Thayer Payne (1856-1841). The Lindsley family eventually returned to the United States of America (U.S.A.) and moved to Milton, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, Massachusetts. Thayer Lindsley attended Milton Academy, a private college preparatory school in Milton. In 1903, he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) from Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts and in 1904 he graduated from Harvard with a degree in Civil Engineering (C.E.).

After graduating from Harvard, Lindsley worked as a civil engineer for the New York Rapid Transit Commission, where he was involved in the construction of the Brooklyn-Manhattan subway; however, his older brother, Halstead Lindsley, was a mining engineer and Lindsley became fascinated with the subject. He took a few geology courses at Columbia University, but most of his knowledge was learned working in mining and as a prospector in the western United States between 1906 and 1914. In 1914, Lindsley discovered the Iron Dyke Mine in Oregon and ran it for Goodzich, Lockhard and Company for three years, until he joined the American Expeditionary Force as an artillery officer when the U.S.A. joined World War I (WWI).

After WWI, Lindsley returned to the Iron Dyke Mine and remained there until 1924. He had received a stake of $30,000 in the Iron Dyke Mine, which he decided to invest in mining in Canada. With a partner, Joseph Errington, Lindsley began exploring areas of Northern Ontario for viable mining prospects. In 1926, the pair staked claims around the Vermilion River, near Sudbury, Ontario, and founded Sudbury Basin Mines.

In 1928, Lindsley founded Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited in Falconbridge, Ontario after purchasing the land claims from Bennett-Longyear for $2,500,000, the most ever paid at that time for a mine in the Sudbury area. Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited was a subsidiary of Ventures Limited, Lindsley’s holding company that he established in 1928 with his brother, Halstead Lindsley, and associates, Joseph Errington, Col. C.D.H. MacAlpine and Gen. D.M. Hogarth. Falconbridge was Venture’s biggest holding and it became one of the world’s biggest nickel mining operations.

In 1929, Thayer Lindsley married Ida Ann Machin, the daughter of a mining executive, in Kenora, Ontario. The marriage lasted until 1935, when Ida Ann Machin went to Reno, Nevada to file for a divorce. The divorce was made legal in Canada by a court in Port Arthur, Ontario in 1936.

Lindsley is known as one of the 20th Century’s most prolific mining developers and executives and was given the nickname “Mr. Mining.” Near the height of his career, in the 1940s-1950s, he was president of ten companies (including the large holding company, Frobisher Inc.), served as a director for fifteen others and held interests in upwards of fifty more companies. Lindsley found or was involved in the development of the following mines: Sherritt Gordon Mine, Manitoba; Giant Yellowknife, Northwest Territories; Beattie Gold Mine, Quebec; Whim Creek, Australia; Connemara, Southern Rhodesia; United Keno, Yukon; Canadian Malartic, Quebec; La Luz, Nicaragua; New Calumet, Ontario and Coniaurum near Porcupine, Ontario.

Lindsley retired as president of Ventures Limited in 1955 and as president of Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited in 1956. He remained a director on the board of Falconbridge Nickel Mines Limited until 1967, when he was given the title of Director Emeritus.

Thayer Lindsley died on May 29, 1976 at his home in New York, New York. He is buried with his parents, John Lindsley and Virginia Thayer Lindsley, in Milton Cemetery in Milton.

Kelly, Michael
003 · Person · 1953 -

Michael Kelly was born in Sudbury Ontario in 1953 and attended Laurentian University from 1973 to 1978. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in History and then matriculated to the University of Toronto (1979-1985) for his Master of Arts in History. During this time, he was asked to write a chapter in an upcoming local Sudbury history book to help celebrate the one hundred anniversary of the founding of Sudbury. The book was divided up into decades and Michael Kelly was assigned 1900-1910. This chapter was later completed by Ashley Thompson and the book was published ten years after its intended publication date in 1993 entitled Sudbury Rail Town to Regional Capital.

Other books Kelly worked on while a student at Laurentian include Inventory and Guide to Historic Building in Sudbury, 1978.

From 1979 to 1985, Kelly traded commercial paper and foreign exchange securities as part of a corporate cash management team with INCO Limited. From 1985 to 1986 he was a regional economic development officer in Northern Ontario and from 1986-1989 he operated as a training consultant for various companies. From 1990 to the present, Kelly has worked as a professor at Cambrian College specializing in Human Relations, Ethics and Project Management.

Grace, George
004 · Person · 1917 - 2007

George Grace was born January 15, 1917. He moved to Sudbury, Ontario from Toronto on December 15, 1939 and began work as a sports reporter for The Sudbury Star in 1942. After serving in World War II, Grace returned to reporting for The Sudbury Star. During the 1950's, Grace developed polio which left his right hand atrophied and forced him into a wheelchair for several years. With the help of his wife Isobel, his condition improved and he continued writing sports articles. Grace was eventually promoted to Executive Editor before retiring in 1980. Ten years later, Grace began a regular sports column entitled 'Looking Back' which ran for about a decade. His final article appeared in the paper December 31, 2000. George Grace passed away December 23, 2007 at the age of 90.

Keir, Robert John
006 · Person · 1931 - 2015

Robert John Keir was born in Port Colborne, Ontario, on April 15th, 1931. While Keir's British grandfather was a professional journalist, Keir himself never received formal training in journalism; instead, he developed and honed his journalistic skills through years of on-the-job experience. Keir began his journalism career at an early age as a paperboy for the Globe & Mail. As an adult, Keir began writing for The Evening Tribute of Welland, Ontario, from 1950-1952. It was also during this time that Keir was given the opportunity to work as a “stringer”, writing additional local stories for large media outlets The Toronto Star and the Buffalo Courier-Express. In 1954, Keir became an out-island feature writer for The Nassau Guardian of Nassau, Bahamas, under a six-month contract. When his contract expired that same year, Keir relocated to Sudbury, Ontario. Once in Sudbury, Keir continued to pursue his journalistic interests, covering local affairs for The Sudbury Star from 1954 until 1956. From 1956 to 1957, Keir reported City Hall proceedings for CKSO Radio and Television and from 1957 to 1959, reported these proceedings for The Sudbury Star.

In 1955, Keir was appointed Northern Ontario Correspondent for The Globe and Mail and retained this freelance position for more than ten years. In 1959, Keir founded the Northern Information Service Company Limited in Sudbury, Ontario. As General Manager, Keir played a participatory role in handling freelance news coverage, public relations, advertising, and photography until he ended the company in 1970. In addition, Keir was one of the founders of The Sudbury Sun in 1962, serving as publisher and editor.

By the early 1960’s, Bob Keir had become an active supporter of local interests. This resulted in a shift in career interests, which saw Keir serve as Public Relations consultant for the City of Sudbury from 1960-1961. Keir served one term as Alderman (1964-1965), and despite not continuing as an elected member of city council, Keir stayed on as a volunteer, serving on various community committees (such as the Sudbury Planning Board and the Parking Authority of Sudbury). Keir moved to Toronto in 1970 to work as Senior Communications Manager for the Ministries of Environment, Natural Resources, and Energy at Queen’s Park, but returned to Sudbury in 1982 to serve as Executive and Communications Officer for Regional Chairman Tom Davies until Keir’s retirement in 1995.

After retiring, Keir continued to publicly voice his concerns over local issues. As one of seven members of the Greater Sudbury Municipal Watch since discussion of Sudbury’s amalgamation began in the late 1990’s, Keir monitors key issues at City Hall. Other local initiatives Keir has been involved in include the Sudbury Community Foundation (as a founding director) and the Sudbury Regional Restructuring Association (as a founder and secretary). In 1992, Keir was awarded the Canada 125 Commemorative Medal for his volunteer efforts and the Ontario 15 Years Voluntarism Award. Additionally, Keir provides regular published insights in letters to the editor for The Sudbury Star.

Steinberg, Israel "Irving"
007 · Person · 1919 - 2011

Israel "Irving" Steinberg was born January 16 1919 in Peterborough Ontario. Shortly after his birth he moved with his parents, Joseph and Leah Steinberg and his sister Rose Steinberg, to Sudbury Ontario where his father founded Toronto Bargain Stores. The Steinbergs lived in Sudbury until 1932 when they moved to Toronto. Joseph Steinberg died on July 14 1963, and Irving Steinberg as executor of his estate retained property in Sudbury until 1968 when it was expropriated by the city as part of a downtown urban development project. Irving Steinberg passed away on March 1, 2011.

Landry, Denis
008 · Person · 1919 - 2008

Denis Landry was born in Azilda, Ontario, on May 16, 1919. He began his academic pursuits at the age of seven and matriculated from Azilda Public School #2 at fourteen with an eighth grade education. Landry was unable to continue formal academic pursuits due to economic reasons and began to work on the family farm where he pasteurized milk and took care of the animals. Landry married his wife Thérèse Paquette on January 6th, 1945 and they had seven children. In order to support his family Landry worked as a miner for Inco at the Levack Nickel Mine Deposit where he held many positions. Despite his work, Landry still found the time for his family, and his community.
Landry was a devote catholic and enjoyed religious music. Denis was a member of the “paroisse de Chelmsford” choir and when the “paroisse Sainte-Agnès” was formed in 1953, he became leader of orchestra and remained so for 20 years.
Landry was an important figure for the education sector in the Azilda - Chelmsford area. He played a significant role during the creation of the Roman Catholic Separate School Section No.1 in 1955. Landry was appointed trustee for the RCS.S No.1 from 1955 to 1956. Thanks to Landry and other trustees, the Roman Catholic schools in the No.1 and No.2 district merged in 1961 and two new Separate schools were created “l’école St-Patrick” and “l’école St-Dominique-Savio”. In 1965 Landry was appointed to serve as trustee for the Chelmsford Valley District High School Board to represent all the Separate Schools in the areas of Rayside Balfour, Chelmsford, Dowling, and Levack. He spent six years as a trustee with the Chelmsford Valley District High School Board, to ensure that Catholic children from the area have an opportunity to pursue their studies at the secondary level. In 1968, the Ministry of Education warned the school boards of its intention to establish larger administrative units. Landry was appointed by the Chelmsford High School Board to serve in the “ADD-Hoc” committee in order to prepare the documents needed to restructure the School Boards in Ontario. Denis was then elected to represent the Western Separate Schools in 1969. He was honored to serve as a representative for the Western Separate Schools for the following 12 years. Denis Landry’s 32 years of service as a trustee for Separate Schools, gave generations of French Catholic children in the Azilda, Rayside area the opportunity to learn and grow in a proper education system.
Landry retired from Inco after 43 years of service. After his retirement he went on to work as a Real Estate agent. He was a strong supporter of the French culture in the community. His passion for education, the town of Azilda and the French culture inspired him to write a book entitled “Azilda comme je l’ai connue”.
Landry was also a member of the “Coopérative funéraire” and the “Club d’âge d’or d’ Azilda” (one of the founding members). For the remainder of his retirement Landry continued to devote himself to his pastimes, his community and his family. Denis Landry passed away on May 6th 2008 at the age of 88.

Delaney, Paul
01-015 · Person · 1944-2012

Paul James Delaney was born in 1944 and lived at Gore's Landing, Lakefield and Midland. He was a student at Trent University from 1964 to 1968 and is listed in the first student register. A member of Trent University’s first graduating class, Delaney became a teacher and went on to win numerous awards, including the Alumni Spirit of Trent Award, TVOntario Teacher of the Year, Pope’s Medal, YMCA Peace Medal, and the Governor General’s Award for Excellence in Teaching History. He was the first Director of Ste. Marie Among the Hurons and taught summer courses in India and Sierra Leone. “Uncle Paul”, as he became known to Trent University's international students, served as Alumnus-in-Residence at Trent, volunteered his time with the Trent International Program, and became a mentor to hundreds of Trent students. Delaney died in 2012. (Taken in part from a March 1, 2013 posting titled "Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Paul Delaney" located on the Trent University web site).

Dudowich, Michael
012 · Person · 1927 - 1998

Michael Dudowich was born January 31st, 1927 in Garson, Ontario. As a young student, Dudowich began working on the weekends for Mr. W.E. Mason at the Sudbury Star in 1943. In high school, Dudowich was the Director of Photography for the Sudbury High yearbook the Wolfhound as well as Assistant Editor for the Catholic Youth Organization Bulletins affiliated with St. John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church. In the 1946 Sudbury High yearbook, grade twelve student Dudowich stated his future goal for later in life was to photograph actress Lana Turner.

In 1947, the Dudowich family moved from Garson to Riverside Drive, Sudbury, Ontario. After graduating with honours from Sudbury High School, Dudowich worked for a short time as a locomotive fireman and then proceeded to work full time for the newspaper. Eventually, he became the photographic supervisor for the Sudbury Star and held the position of 'Chief Photographer' for decades prior to his retirement in May, 1976.

Dudowich was an active member of the Commercial and Press Photographers' Association of Canada (CPPAC) for many years. He frequently attended the short course in photography held annually at the University of Western Ontario by the group and won multiple awards for his photographs including the CPPAC Award of Merit and several of the Canadian Press Picture-of-the-Month awards. He was chosen Best Photographer of Canada, and his work appeared in the publication "America." In 1972, Dudowich received awards from the Canadian Government and the Canadian Press for his work in the Russian/Canadian Hockey Series of that year.

Dudowich was a charter member of the Idylwylde Golf and Country Club, a member of the Ukrainian Congress of Canada, the Laurentian Museum and Arts Centre and St. Mary's Ukrainian Catholic Church.

Michael Dudowich passed away on May 4th, 1998 at the age of 71.

Heit, Jack
015-.1 · Person · 1914-1999

Jacob 'Jack' Sebastian Heit was born on February 5, 1914 in Tramping Lake, Saskatchewan. He moved to Sudbury, Ontario, traveling by train at a cost of $6, and arrived on March 25, 1938. Heit took many odd jobs such as seasonal mail deliverer during the Christmas season in 1939 or work for Pioneer Construction in 1940. Other odd jobs included 'pick and shovel' work, farm work, house construction, cement drilling, and steel jobs. He worked for firms such as Red Brown Cement Products, Gustiana Company, and A.L. McGinn using his skills as a mechanic and blacksmith.

He began his career at Falconbridge Nickel Mines Ltd in 1941 underground as a miner. He later became an Inspector for Mine Safety and First Aid. Heit was certified in basic Mine Rescue Training at the Sudbury Rescue Station in June 1948. By 1951, he received the Advanced Mine Rescue Training and in 1961 the Supervisory Advanced Mine Rescue Training. In May 1950, Heit was a member of the winning team of the inaugural First Aid Championship of Falconbridge Nickel Mines at a competition held in the Community Hall. Heit continued to compete in both local and Northern Ontario mine rescue competitions and won several times. Awards included the H.J. Fraser Trophy for defeating the top plant first aid team at Falconbridge.

Heit was also an avid volunteer with the Garson Volunteer Fire Department for 20 years (circa 1950 to February 1971). When Heit resigned from the fire department, he held the position of 'deputy fire chief.' He was also an amateur photographer and won 1st prize for the best photograph of the King and Queen's visit to Sudbury in 1939.

Jack Heit married Katherine 'Kay' Kraft (born March 4, 1918 in Allan, Saskatchewan) on February 5, 1940 at Christ the King Church in Sudbury, Ontario. They had five daughters, Diana (1941), Janet (1943), Marilyn (1947), Kathy (1948), and Susan (1954).

Heit retired from Falconbridge Ltd in 1976. He remained active in the community with bridge games, curling, and water skiing. For their 50th wedding anniversary, Jack and Kay Heit renewed their vows at the same church they were originally married.

Jack Heit passed away on November 5, 1999 at the age of 85 at Extendicare York in Sudbury, Ontario.

Mulcahey, Diana (nee Heit)
015-.2 · Person · 1941 - present

Diana Joyce Heit was born January 3, 1941 in Sudbury, Ontario. The eldest of Jacob and Katherine Heit's five children, Diana was raised in Garson, Ontario. She attended St. John's Separate School in Garson and often went to Falcona Camp, run by Falconbridge Mine in the summer. Diana Heit married Lawrence Thomas Mulcahey on September 5, 1964 at St. John's Church in Garson. She later became the Assistant Programme Director for the Recreation Department of the City of Sudbury. With this position, Mulcahey assisted with the creation of the game ringette. She designed the crests for the local team tournaments and organized the first games.

Chisholm, Ann Eva
016-.1 · Person · 1924-2000

Eeva Annikki Kantokoski was born May 8, 1924 in Alajärvi, Finland to Matias (Matti) Niilo Kantokoski (born 1901), and his wife Anna Milia (born 1903). The family name was shortened from Kantokoski to Koski, but it is unclear when exactly this occurred. Eeva Annikki and her parents immigrated to Canada in 1924. They arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia on August 2, 1924, and then settled in Sudbury, Ontario. In December 1925, Eeva Annikki’s brother, Veikko Vesa Matias Kantokoski (Koski) was born. Sometime after their arrival in Canada Eeva Annikki's name was changed to Ann Eva, though others often referred to her as Anne, Anni or Annie. The family's early years were spent in Sudbury, Ontario.

After the death of their mother in 1933, Ann and her brother Veikko lived with their father in Sudbury during the summer months and their aunt Ida Marie (Koivula) Lehti in Oshawa during the winter. Ann completed her education in Sudbury, Ontario in 1939, and gained a High School Entrance Certificate, though she did not attend due to the cost. Once she completed her schooling in 1939 she found employment in domestic service for Mrs. J. Ferrier, in Sudbury. Between 1940 and 1941 she worked at Korpela's Grocery Store on Bancroft Drive, and Maki's Restaurant on Elgin Street in Sudbury, Ontario.

In 1942, Ann moved to Malartic, Quebec to work in a bunkhouse and kitchen in a mining town. There she met Archie Chisholm, whom she married in Montreal on May 24, 1942. Their first child, Carl Richard, was born in 1943. When her husband was posted overseas during World War II, Ann returned to Sudbury to stay with relatives, and completed a Red Cross Volunteer Nursing Service course during that time. After the Second World War, Ann and Archie had two more children; Leslie Karen and Barry Neil.

While living in North-western Quebec, Ann contributed her time to the Protestant Elementary School Board and the Canadian Air Force Ground Observer Corps. In 1974, she separated from her husband and moved to Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. There she completed high school and went on to study nursing. She became a Certified Nursing Assistant, and obtained a post-graduate diploma in psychiatric nursing. Between 1976 and 1986 she worked at the Nova Scotia Hospital.

Ann Eva Chisholm died on March 12, 2000 at the age of 74, and is buried in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

Dufour, Jim
019 · Person · 1945 - present

Jim Dufour was born in Thunder Bay, Ontario in 1945. He moved to Sudbury for work at INCO in 1964 at the Copper Cliff Iron Ore Plant. After a year in Copper Cliff, Dufour was moved to Stobie Mine where he worked for the next 34 years. At Stobie, Dufour performed a variety of tasks over the years including working underground. For the last 15 years of his career, Dufour was responsible for scheduling and training miners at Stobie. He co-ordinated the instuctors for training new employees on the history of mining, terminology, current practices, and safety. After 35 years at INCO, Jim Dufour retired in 1999.

E. A. Collins
022 · Person · 1870 - 1952

Everett Alfred “Fred” Collins was born January 19, 1870 to Irish immigrant, yeoman and later merchant James Collins and his wife Elizabeth Frances Knobbs on a farm near Smithfield, Ontario. One of ten children, Collins received his public elementary education in Smithfield, matriculated to high school in Brighton, Ontario and graduated from the Model School in Madoc, Ontario. Upon graduation, Collins taught in Hastings County for a year. After that time, Collins worked for the railway with a survey party laying the Grand Trunk Railway line. While in this position, he met businessman Samuel J. Ritchie and through him, Almon Penfield Turner, who eventually became the general manager of the Canadian Copper Company.

In 1900, Turner offered Collins a job as a clerk at the Copper Cliff Mine. Collins switched to the East Smelter and in late 1901 he entered Queen’s University while continuing to work in Copper Cliff, Ontario during his summer vacations. In 1905, Collins graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in mining engineering and began work as a clerk on the Canadian Copper Company’s hydro-electric development at High Falls. In 1906, Collins worked in a laboratory in Hamilton, Ontario testing samples of cobalt-silver ores for a smelter. Collins went to Joplin, Missouri in January 1907 to work as a superintendent of mines at a lead and zinc mining company for several years. In 1909, Collins returned to Canada, where he worked investigating non-metallic deposits for a financial group before being appointed Inspector of Mining for the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests. On November 11, 1918, Collins returned to Copper Cliff to begin work as Safety Engineer for Inco, and later became Assistant to the General Manager and Vice-President of Inco in 1920. In this position, Collins served under three vice-presidents during his twenty-six years of service.

Collins was best known for his participation in local politics. Collins served as a councilor in Copper Cliff from 1923 to 1930. He was elected as mayor of Copper Cliff in 1930 and served in this role until his retirement in 1946. After retirement, Collins remained active, serving as chairman of the Sudbury Memorial Hospital and as a member of the Ontario Cancer Commission. He was also a member of the Queen’s University Alumni Association, the board of governors of Queen’s University, trustee of Albert College, Belleville, member of the local advisory board of the Guaranty Trust Company, member of the Idylwylde Golf Club, member of the Granite Club, past president of the Copper Cliff Club, honorary member of the Canadian Legion, Copper Cliff branch, member of the Shrine and Masonic organizations, past president of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, member of the Ontario Association of Professional Engineers, chairman of the Ontario National War Finance Committee in Sudbury and Manitoulin Island, past president of the Sudbury Rotary Club, and secretary of Inco’ Quarter Century Club.

Collins married music teacher Margaret Maude Walsh in Kingston, Ontario in 1909. They had one son, George E. Collins, who became a prominent Sudbury lawyer. Maude passed away in October 1935. Collins later remarried Beatrice M. Jacques in September 1946.

Fred Collins passed away on February 6, 1952 at the age of 74 in Copper Cliff, Ontario.

Collins, E. A.
022 · Person · 1870 - 1952

Everett Alfred “Fred” Collins was born one of ten children to Irish immigrant and yeoman, later merchant, James Collins and his wife Elizabeth Frances Knobbs on a farm near Smithfield, Ontario in Northumberland County, January 19, 1870. Collins received his public elementary education in Smithfield, matriculated to high school in Brighton, and graduated from the Model School in Madoc, Ontario. Upon graduation, Collins taught in Hastings County for a year. After that time, Collins worked for the railway with a survey party laying the Grand Trunk Railway line. While in this position, Collins met businessman Samuel J. Ritchie and through him, Almon Penfield Turner, who eventually became the general manager of the Canadian Copper Company.

In 1900, Turner offered Collins a job as a clerk at the Copper Cliff Mine. Collins switched to the East Smelter and in late 1901 he entered Queen’s University while continuing to work in Copper Cliff during his summer vacations. In 1905, Collins graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in mining engineering and began work as a clerk on the Canadian Copper Company’s hydro-electric development at High Falls. In 1906, Collins worked in a laboratory in Hamilton, Ontario testing samples of cobalt-silver ores for a smelter. Collins went to Joplin, Missouri in January 1907 to work as a superintendent of mines at a lead and zinc mining company for several years. In 1909, Collins returned to Canada, where he worked investigating non-metallic deposits for a financial group before being appointed Inspector of Mining for the Ontario Department of Lands and Forests. On November 11, 1918, Collins returned to Copper Cliff to begin work as Safety Engineer for Inco, and later became Assistant to the General Manager and Vice-President of Inco in 1920. In this position, Collins served under three vice-presidents during his twenty-six years of service.

Collins was best known for his participation in local politics. Collins served as a councilor in Copper Cliff from 1923 to 1930. He was elected as mayor of Copper Cliff in 1930, and served in this role until his retirement in 1946. After retirement, Collins remained active, serving as chairman of the Sudbury Memorial Hospital and as a member of the Ontario Cancer Commission. He was also a member of the Queen’s University Alumni Association, the board of governors of Queen’s University, trustee of Albert College, Belleville, member of the local advisory board of the Guaranty Trust Company, member of the Idylwylde Golf Club, member of the Granite Club, past president of the Copper Cliff Club, honorary member of the Canadian Legion, Copper Cliff branch, member of the Shrine and Masonic organizations, past president of the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, member of the Ontario Association of Professional Engineers, chairman of the Ontario National War Finance Committee in Sudbury and Manitoulin Island, past president of the Sudbury Rotary Club, and secretary of Inco’ Quarter Century Club.

Collins married music teacher Margaret Maude Walsh in Kingston, Ontario in 1909. They had one son, George E. Collins, who became a prominent Sudbury lawyer. Maude passed away in October 1935. Collins later remarried Beatrice M. Jacques in September 1946.

Fred Collins passed away on February 6, 1952 at the age of 74 in Copper Cliff, Ontario.

Gloster, Bernard James
023 · Person · 1914-1966

Bernard James Gloster (aka Barney Gloster) was born August 4, 1914 in Toronto, Ontario to news photographer Bernard Joseph Gloster (1879-1948) and Martha Jane McCauley (1883-1942). His family moved to Scarborough, Ontario by 1921. Like his father before him, Gloster became a photographer. He married Gladys Helen O'Mara (1917-1995) in Toronto on August 10, 1936. Bernard and Gladys Gloster then moved to Sudbury, Ontario later that same year and Bernard Gloster continued his photography work for the Sudbury Star until October 30, 1939 when he left to pursue a position as photographer for the Windsor Star.

During World War Two, Gloster served as a photographer for the army and after returning to Windsor, Ontario opened his own studio.

Bernard Gloster remained an active photographer until his death on February 18, 1966 at the age of 51.

Ashworth, George Johnston
023 · Person · 1862-1937

George Johnston Ashworth was born June 26, 1862 in Quebec to William Henry Ashworth (1820-1901) and Jane Murray Ashworth (nee Johnston, 1835-1908). By the late 1860’s, the family moved to Newmarket, Ontario where William Ashworth worked as a hat manufacturer. The fourth of thirteen children, George J. Ashworth entered the family business. He worked as a hat manufacturer with his father and in 1883, both father and son purchased the Newmarket Hat Factory as a joint venture.

During the Northwest Rebellion in 1885, George Ashworth served as a Captain in the 12th Battalion York Rangers. After completing his military service, Ashworth returned to work with the family business in Newmarket. Four years later, Ashworth moved to Toronto, Ontario where two of his brothers were living, and began studying law at Osgoode Hall. By the following year, the rest of his family relocated to Toronto.

During his years as a law student, Ashworth worked at Macdonald & Cartwright, later Macdonald, Cartwright & Garvey, a law firm in Toronto. It does not appear that George J. Ashworth completed his law studies in Ontario.

In 1895, Ashworth served as the Secretary and Manager of the Sun Savings and Loan Company. By August 1895, the company was in a state of turmoil as management and shareholders disagreed on how to manage the company. Ashworth was replaced by Samuel Nesbitt during a reorganization but shareholders reappointed him and he subsequently returned to the office with his brother, John Ashworth, who was advising him as his lawyer. The police were called and several individuals were arrested for trespass. In 1896, Samuel Nesbitt was listed as the manager of the company.

By 1898, Ashworth co-founded a mining broker company, Henry A Drummond & George J Ashworth Mining Brokers in Toronto, Ontario. In 1900, Ashworth was employed as the Secretary for the Aqueduct Construction Company but returned to the broker profession by the following year and remained until 1903.

On October 4, 1904, George J. Ashworth married Kathrine Williams (1870-1949) of Hamilton, Ontario in New York. On May 13, 1906, the couple’s only child, George William Ashworth (1906-1998), was born in Toronto, Ontario. By the following year, Ashworth was employed as a reporter for the Toronto Star.

In 1908, George J. Ashworth moved to Sudbury, Ontario where he lived with his wife and son at 149 Elm Street. While in Sudbury, Ashworth started his own newspaper, the Daily Northern Star (aka the Daily Star or the Sudbury Star). The newspaper claimed to be the “first morning daily newspaper between Toronto and the ‘North Pole.’” The first issue of the first edition was published on January 11, 1909. The newspaper’s first issue stated under its article “Why We Are Here,” it was “established solely for the purpose of serving the people and interests of New Ontario first, last, and all the time. It is not the organ of any clique, corporation or political party. We believe that in serving the interests of the whole people we shall be fulfilling our proper destiny.”

After the first six months, the newspaper suffered financial difficulties. The Printing Forman, William Edge Mason, was instrumental in helping find and secure the financial help of local businesses and after the newspaper required additional financial support later in 1910, it reduced its publication to two days a week and was renamed the Sudbury Star. Sometime before January 1910, Ashworth had resigned and Mason became the owner and publisher of the newspaper.

In January 1910, Ashworth visited his sister in Vancouver, British Columbia and shortly after decided to relocate to the west coast. He worked as a reporter for Vancouver World, the News-Advertiser and the Vancouver Sun. In 1920, he ran in the British Columbia General Election in Vancouver for the Vancouver Rentpayers Association party but was not elected.

The Ashworths enjoyed vacationing on Savary Island in British Columbia and during the late 1920s, George J. Ashworth established the Royal Savary Hotel. Ashworth held the positon of manager until his death.

George J. Ashworth passed away on Savary Island in British Columbia on April 13, 1937 at the age of 74.

Mason, William E.
023 · Person · 1882-1948

William E. Mason was born March 2, 1882 in Walkerton, Ontario to David Mason (a carpenter) and Mary Lindsay Mason. Mason was registered under the name William Edgar Mason on his birth certificate but his death record, obituary and grave marker record his name as William Edge Mason. The eldest of six children, Mason began a three-year apprenticeship with the Walkerton Telescope. First as a printer’s devil for the newspaper and, by 1900, as a journeyman printer.

On October 31, 1906, Mason married Alice Maud Tinlin (1877-1945) in St. Catharines, Ontario. The couple met when they were both working for McLaren’s Limited, a dry goods business in St. Catharines. Mason was employed at the company as the advertising manager. At the time of the wedding, Mason was working as a real estate agent in St. Catharines.

The Masons moved to Toronto, Ontario and William E. Mason worked for the newspaper, Toronto Saturday Night as an assistant foreman.

On November 7, 1907, the Masons moved to Sudbury, Ontario. William E. Mason worked as a printer for Sudbury Mining News. He became the printing foreman in the mechanical department for the new newspaper, the Daily Northern Star (later known as the Sudbury Star), which published its first issue on January 11, 1909. After the newspaper suffered financial difficulties, Mason acquired local business investments for the newspaper and became the manager and owner a short time later.

In 1927, Mason acquired the North Bay Nugget. He also started CKSO radio in Sudbury, with the first broadcast from the radio station airing on August 19, 1935.

William E. Mason passed away on June 22, 1948.

Forestell, Patricia
028 · Person · 1936 - 1969

Reverend Sister Mary Patricia Forestell was born on October 2, 1936 in Coniston, Ontario to Daniel Clary Forestell and Helena Jane Forestell, nee Smith (Lena Forestell). The Forestell family first moved to Coniston in 1914 for work with the Mond Nickel Company, and later INCO. The youngest of eleven children (three of which died during the second world war), Sister Patricia Forestell received her early education at Our Lady of Mercy School in Coniston, before graduating from St. Joseph's College in North Bay, Ontario. It was during these years that she participated in the Girl Guides. She was a member of the 1st Coniston Girl Guide Company where she was part of the Blue Bird Patrol and later of the Lone Company at St. Joseph's College. After finishing her studies at St. Joseph's College, she travelled to Franklin, Pennsylvania where she entered the order of the White Sisters of Africa. Her first posting after taking her final vows was to North Africa, where she spent two years administering to the sick in Algiers at a hospital. Following this posting, Sister Patricia received a degree in nursing from the University of Washington in Washington, District of Columbia. After graduating, she spent time with her family in Coniston, before returning to Africa where she was in charge of a hospital in Nandom, Ghana. Sister Patricia Forestell returned to the United States in April 1968 due to her failing health. She died of cancer on March 16, 1969 in Piscataway [New Brunswick], New Jersey at the age of thirty-two. She is buried in the Roman Catholic Cemetery in Coniston, Ontario.