Showing 19531 results

People and organizations

Ron Nelson Photography Ltd.

  • AFC 450
  • Corporate body
  • 1946-1990

George Ronald Nelson was born on January 2, 1915 in London,Ontario. Nelson began his career as a professional photographer in 1932. For a time, he operated as G.R. Nelson Photography. He served as an official photographer for the Royal Visit of 1939. Nelson served in the Royal Canadian Air Force and Navy between 1941 and 1946. Nelson received a licence from the City of London to operate a photography business in late 1946. This business was known as Ron Nelson Photography. The firm's work was primarily commercial and aerial photography, although some individual and group portraits were done as well. The Province of Ontario established a corporation called Ron Nelson Photography, Ltd. in October, 1966. Nelson transferred all of his assets to the new corporation later that same year. In 1985, Nelson began to wind the business down by selling off many assets, including his studio at 388-392 Horton St. The corporation was formally dissolved in 1990. Ron Nelson died on April 4, 1994.

Eisenhardt, Jan, 1906-2004

  • AFC 451
  • Person
  • 1906-2004

Jan (Ian) Eisenhardt was born April 24th, 1906 in Hjørring, Denmark. After attending schools in Denmark and France, Eisenhardt received a scholarship to study at the University of British Columbia’s School of Commerce in 1928. From 1929-1930, Eisenhardt worked as a Playground Attendant for the City of Vancouver before returning to France to play professional football (soccer) for the Olympique de Marseille football club. In 1932, Eisenhardt returned to Vancouver and became the Playground Supervisor for Vancouver. In 1933, Eisenhardt became a Canadian citizen.

In 1934, as the Director of Physical Education for the Province of BC, Eisenhardt developed and led the Provincial Recreation program, popularly known as Pro Rec. In this role and as the Chairman of a federal committee on Youth Welfare, Eisenhardt developed recreation and fitness programs for the unemployed during the Depression. At the outbreak of World War II, Eisenhardt enlisted in the Canadian Army, rising to the rank of Major and becoming the director of the Canadian Army Sports Program in 1943. In 1944, he was named National Director of Physical Fitness for Canada and appointed chair of the National Council on Physical Fitness where he participated in drafting the National Physical Fitness Act. After the war, Eisenhardt became the Director of Staff Activities for the United Nations in New York in 1947 and was later assigned to UNESCO in Paris.

In February of 1950, Eisenhardt became the Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation for the Indian Affairs branch of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration. In this role, he toured and drafted a physical education programme for residential schools and established the Tom Longboat Awards. By November of 1951, dissatisfied with the lack of support for the physical education program, Eisenhardt resigned from his position effective December 1951. In January 1952, shortly after beginning his job as the Director of Canadair Employees’ Recreation Association in Montreal, he was fired from this position after having allegedly been ‘blacklisted’ by the Canadian government. Eisenhardt later spent years working to clear his name and made a claim for compensation from the government.

In Quebec, Eisenhardt worked for the Community Club in La Tuque in 1953 and was hired by the Dominion Life Assurance Company in Montreal in 1954. Eisenhardt was active in the Danish community in Canada, serving as President of the Danish Club in Montreal from 1960-1965. In the 1970s, Eisenhardt worked as a lecturer of Scandinavian literature and Campus Administrator for John Abbott College where he organized tours of Denmark and East Germany for students. Eisenhardt continued to promote fitness and recreation initiatives, including crossing the Øresund Bridge from Denmark to Sweden in 2000 and Walk for Health, where he visited elementary schools to promote staying active. As a resident of Dorval, Eisenhardt ran for Alderman in 1992 and Mayor in 1998.

Later in life, Eisenhardt received many accolades for his contributions to sport and recreation in Canada including a Canadian Sports Lifetime Achievement Award, a Queen’s Jubilee Medal, and was a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada. He received an honorary Doctorate of Laws from Malaspina University College (now Vancouver Island University) in 2004. Jan Eisenhardt married Barbara Ferdon in 1949 and had four children. Barbara died in 1995 and Jan Eisenhardt died on December 26, 2004 at the age of 98.

Eisenhardt, Jan

  • AFC 451
  • Person
  • 1906-2004

Jan (Ian) Eisenhardt was born April 24th, 1906 in Hjørring, Denmark.After attending schools in Denmark and France, Eisenhardt received a scholarship to study at the University of British Columbia’s School of Commerce in 1928. From 1929-1930, Eisenhardt worked as a Playground Attendant for the City of Vancouver before returning to France to play professional football (soccer) for the Olympique de Marseille football club. In 1932, Eisenhardt returned to Vancouver and became the Playground Supervisor for Vancouver. In 1933, Eisenhardt became a Canadian citizen.In 1934, as the Director of Physical Education for the Province of BC, Eisenhardt developed and led the Provincial Recreation program, popularly known as Pro Rec. In this role and as the Chairman of a federal committee on Youth Welfare, Eisenhardt developed recreation and fitness programs for the unemployed during the Depression. At the outbreak of World War II, Eisenhardt enlisted in the Canadian Army, rising to the rank of Major and becoming the director of the Canadian Army Sports Program in 1943. In 1944, he was named National Director of Physical Fitness for Canada and appointed chair of the National Council on Physical Fitness where he participated in drafting the National Physical Fitness Act. After the war, Eisenhardt became the Director of Staff Activities for the United Nations in New York in 1947 and was later assigned to UNESCO in Paris.In February of 1950, Eisenhardt became the Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation for the Indian Affairs branch of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration. In this role, he toured and drafted a physical education programme for residential schools and established the Tom Longboat Awards. By November of 1951, dissatisfied with the lack of support for the physical education program, Eisenhardt resigned from his position effective December 1951. In January1952, shortly after beginning his job as the Director of Canadair Employees’ Recreation Association in Montreal, he was fired from this position after having allegedly been ‘blacklisted’ bythe Canadian government. Eisenhardt later spent years working to clear his name and made a claim for compensation from the government.In Quebec, Eisenhardt worked for the Community Club in La Tuque in 1953 and was hired by the Dominion Life Assurance Company in Montreal in 1954. Eisenhardt was active in the Danish community in Canada, serving as President of the Danish Club in Montreal from 1960-1965. In the1970s, Eisenhardt worked as a lecturer of Scandinavian literature and Campus Administrator for John Abbott College where he organized tours of Denmark and East Germany for students. Eisenhardt continued to promote fitness and recreation initiatives, including crossing the Øresund Bridge from Denmark to Sweden in 2000 and Walk for Health, where he visited elementary schools to promote staying active. As a resident of Dorval, Eisenhardt ran for Alderman in 1992and Mayor in 1998. Later in life, Eisenhardt received many accolades for his contributions to sport and recreation in Canada including a Canadian Sports Lifetime Achievement Award, a Queen’s Jubilee Medal, and was a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada. He received an honorary Doctorate of Laws from Malaspina University College (now Vancouver Island University) in 2004. Jan Eisenhardt married Barbara Ferdon in 1949 and had four children. Barbara died in1995 and Jan Eisenhardt died on December 26, 2004 at the age of 98.

Abbeyfield Housing Society of Shanty Bay

  • Abbeyfield Housing Society of Shanty Bay
  • Corporate body
  • 2000-2004

Abbeyfield Housing Society of Shanty Bay was a volunteer organization founded to bring a retirement home (O'Brien House) to Shanty Bay.

Aldborough Old Boys Association

  • Aldborough Old Boys Association
  • Corporate body
  • 1920-[?]

The Aldborough Old Boys Association was organized on November 27, 1920, and the first officers were as follows: President Hon. F.G. Macdiarmid; Vice-President Archibald MacColl, Secretary J.G. Gillies, Treasurer Robert Kelly; Directors Duncan McPhail, Peter Stalker, Dr. S.M. Dorland, D.M. Buchan, James Barnett, Daniel MacKillop and Michael Baker.
To commemorate the landing, at Nellie's Hill, of the early pioneers, in grateful recognition of their bravery, sacrifice, suffering, and self-denial, and to perpetuate the cherished memory of those nation builders, The Aldborough Old Boys' Association purchased and possessed several acres of land at the lakeside, and thereon are erected a number of good buildings that were used by the community when holding picnics and other public gatherings. These inviting grounds had gained popular favour with the residents of the township, and for many miles around various organizations had selected them for annual and other gatherings.
The Association has also erected an attractive cairn bearing the names of many early settlers and likewise the names of those from the township who served in the First World War.

Brian Mendes

  • BM
  • Person
  • c. 1940/1960-

Mr. Brian Mendes of Kitchener, Ontario has undertaken research into the development and manufacture of Canadian Army Type Anti-Aircraft Radars from 1939-1946.

Berton, Janet

  • Berton, Janet
  • Person
  • 1920 - 2015

Janet Berton was born Janet Walker in Fernie, British Columbia on 29 June 1920. Her parents moved to Haney in the Fraser Valley when she was 15.

In 1938 she enrolled at the University of British Columbia. Ms. Walker was very active in campus life, taking on a variety of roles that included being an executive member of more than a dozen organizations including Phrateres, The Letters Club, The Alpha Delta Pi Sorority, the Radio Society and the Student Christian Movement. However, her main interest was journalism, and she edited the student handbook, Tillicum, and served on the editorial board of the UBC yearbook, The Totem. Eventually she would become the senior editor of the Tuesday edition of the semi-weekly campus paper, the Ubyssey. The Friday editor was Pierre Berton, whom she would eventually marry several years later.

Her career in journalism continued after her graduation in 1941 when she went to work for the Vancouver Daily Province. In 1946 she had to give up her career at the Province after marrying Pierre Berton, as he was a reporter for the rival Sun newspaper. In the summer of 1947 Pierre became assistant editor at Maclean’s and the couple moved to Kleinburg, Ontario in 1959. The Bertons raised eight children, including one adopted daughter and one foster son.

Mrs. Berton is a community-minded individual who was active in a variety of different organizations. She served on the Heritage Vaughan Committee beginning in 1981, and was a member of the executive for both the Kleinburg and Area Ratepayers’ Association (KARA) and the Kleinburg Binder Twine Festival. She was also a past president of the University Women’s Club of North York, a vice-president of the University Women’s Club of the Town of Vaughan, and editor of the national Chronicle of the University Women’s Club of Canada. She co-edited the 60 year history and the 75 year history of the Canadian Federation of University Women.

Mrs. Berton was a founding organizer of HELP, a local information and referral service in Vaughan. She also volunteered her time to several organizations, including Dellcrest Children’s Home for Disturbed Children, The Kleinburg Home and School Association, the Kleinburg United Church (of which she sat on the Board of Stewards) which included running the Explorer’s Group for Girls between the ages of 8 and 11 for over twenty years. She also served on the Humber Heritage Committee and Community Heritage Ontario. In 1992 she received a Volunteer Service Award for her outstanding contributions.

Berton, Pierre

  • Berton, Pierre
  • Person
  • 1920-2004

Pierre Francis de Marigny Berton was a noted Canadian author of non-fiction, especially Canadiana and Canadian history, and was a well-known television personality and journalist. An accomplished storyteller, Berton was one of Canada's most prolific and popular authors. He wrote on popular culture, Canadian history, critiques of mainstream religion, anthologies, children's books and historical works for youth. He was also a founder of the Writers' Trust of Canada, a non-profit literary organization that seeks to encourage Canada's writing community. His childhood home in Dawson City, Yukon, now called the Berton House, is currently used as a retreat for professional Canadian writers.

He was born on July 12, 1920, in Whitehorse, Yukon, where his father had moved for the 1898 Klondike Gold Rush. His family moved to Dawson City, Yukon in 1921, where they lived until moving to Victoria, British Columbia in 1932. His mother, Laura Beatrice Berton (née Thompson) was a school teacher in Toronto until she was offered a job as a teacher in Dawson City at the age of 29 in 1907. She met Frank Berton in the nearby mining town of Granville shortly after settling in Dawson and teaching kindergarten.

Like his father, Pierre Berton worked in Klondike mining camps during his years as a history major at the University of British Columbia where he also worked on the student paper The Ubyssey. It was here that Pierre met Janet, the senior editor of the Tuesday edition, and they married in 1946. The Bertons raised eight children, including one adopted daughter and one foster son.

Berton was conscripted into the Canadian Army under the National Resources Mobilization Act in 1942 and attended basic training in British Columbia, nominally as a reinforcement soldier intended for The Seaforth Highlanders of Canada. He elected to "go Active" (the euphemism for volunteering for overseas service). He was warned for overseas duty many times, and was granted embarkation leave many times, each time finding his overseas draft being cancelled.

The Bertons moved to Kleinburg ca. 1950. At the age of 31, Pierre was named managing editor of Macleans. In 1957, he became a key member of the CBC's public affairs flagship program, Close-Up, and a permanent panelist on the popular television show Front Page Challenge. That same year, he also narrated the Academy Award-nominated National Film Board of Canada documentary City of Gold, exploring life in his hometown of Dawson City during the Klondike Gold Rush. Berton joined the Toronto Star as associate editor and columnist in 1958, leaving in 1962 to commence The Pierre Berton Show, which ran until 1973.

Berton served as the Chancellor of Yukon College and, along with numerous honorary degrees, received over 30 literary awards such as the Governor General's Award for Creative Non-Fiction (three times), the Stephen Leacock Medal of Humour, and the Gabrielle Léger Award for Lifetime Achievement in Heritage Conservation. He is a member of Canada's Walk of Fame, having been inducted in 1998. He was named a Companion of the Order of Canada, Canada's highest decoration, and was also a member of the Order of Ontario.

In 2004, Berton published his 50th book, Prisoners of the North, after which he announced in an interview with CanWest News Service that he was retiring from writing. On October 17, 2004, the $12.6 million CAD Pierre Berton Resource Library, named in his honour, was opened in Vaughan, Ontario. A school in Vaughan, Ontario was also named after Pierre Berton in the York Region District School Board in September of 2011.

Berton passed away at Sunnybrook hospital in Toronto, reportedly of heart failure, at the age of 84 on November 30, 2004. His cremated remains were scattered at his home in Kleinburg.

Brimmell, R.P. (Richard Philip)

  • C2
  • Person
  • 1928-2007

Richard P. Brimmell was a local historian and former Guelph Mercury newspaper editor. He came to Guelph in 1954. Richard Brimmell worked at the Guelph Mercury as city editor and later as a managing editor until 1960. He then accepted the position of business administrator at the Wellington County Board of Education, a position he held until 1970. During his time at the Board of Education, he served as the president of the Ontario Association of School Business Officials. After returning to the Guelph Mercury briefly in the 1970's, he joined the City of Guelph as City Purchasing agent, retiring after thirteen years of service. In addition to his work with the Mercury he also wrote editorials and columns for the Guelph Tribune. Mr. Brimmell also served as Chairmen of the Guelph Public Library Board.

Throughout his career, Richard Brimmell continued to write local histories and articles chronicling Guelph and its stories. As a member of the 11th Field Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery, Richard Brimmell wrote a regimental history. He also continued his community service with the Evergreen Seniors Centre in Guelph.

He died November 28, 2007 at 79 years of age.

Moon, Alex, 1926-1987

  • C3
  • Person
  • [1830?]-1935

Alexander (Alex) Moon was a Guelph lawyer and heritage preservationist. He helped found the Guelph Civic Museum and served on its board in various capacities, including chairman. He was also well known for his work in the preservation of Guelph's heritage buildings. Mr. Moon died in July of 1987 at the age of 61.

Guelph Public Library Puslinch Pioneer collection

  • C34
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-2013

The first circulating library in Guelph appeared in the rear of the general store operated by one of the city's early merchants, Thomas Sandilands, in 1832. For more than fifteen years, this small collection of books remained the closest thing to a public library in Guelph. On January 14, 1850, a number of local citizens met for the purpose of organizing a Farmers' and Mechanics' Institute in Guelph. Within a few months, a library was collected and a reading room was opened for the use of the members. In addition to the operation of a lending library, the objective of the Guelph Farmers' and Mechanics' Institute was to encourage the diffusion of knowledge among its members through the delivery of lectures and instruction in reading. With the passage of the Free Libraries Act in 1882, Guelph became one of the first communities in Ontario to take advantage of the Act's provisions to establish a public library supported by local taxes. In 1883, the Guelph Free Public Library was founded. The Mechanics' Institute agreed to transfer its holdings and jurisdiction to the new Board of Management of the Guelph Free Public Library on March 15, 1883. The new library occupied premises adjacent to the former City Hall building until 1905. As the library grew and services expanded, a new facility was needed.
The City of Guelph was one of the first North American municipalities to receive a grant from the Carnegie Foundation, a philanthropic charity of American steel magnate, Andrew Carnegie, to build a new library. When the new Carnegie Library was completed in 1905, the Guelph Public Library moved to its present location at the corner of Norfolk and Paisley Streets.

The Carnegie building, though beautiful, proved too small for Guelph's growing population. In 1964, the Carnegie Library was demolished and, after months in a temporary residence, the current main library opened its doors in November of 1965. A new addition to the main library building was completed in 1975.

The Guelph Public Library continued to grow in order to meet the demands of the City's physical expansion and growth in population. During the late 70's and early 80's, a traveling bookmobile and two satellite branches were added, providing citizens with neighbourhood libraries where they could easily browse for reading material. A third branch in the West End was completed in 2001. Further growth in the City's south end resulted in a fourth branch, Westminster Square, located at 100-31 Farley Drive which opened in November 2006. A fifth branch, the East Side Branch, opened in May 2010.

With the addition of the virtual library, the Guelph Public Library is fulfilling its mission to serve the changing needs of the local population by becoming a gateway to the information networks of the world.

Goldie (family)

  • C4
  • Family
  • 1824 - [194-?]

The Goldie family members were prominent mill owners, citizens and politicians in Guelph. James Goldie (1824-1912) and his wife, Frances Owen (1824-1908) and young son Thomas (1850-1892), moved to Guelph in 1850 from Utica, New York, where James had learned the milling trade. After his arrival in Guelph, James Goldie bought and rebuilt two mills in the area. In 1860, he purchased a barrel and stave factory, located on present-day Speedvale Avenue by the Speed River. On this site, he built a flour mill and a new house for his family. In 1866, he also purchased the burned out remains and land of the People's Mill on Cardigan Street by the river. When this mill was rebuilt, he sold the Speedvale mill to John Pipe in 1867-1868. The family then moved into a house on Cardigan Street. By this time, James and Frances Goldie had four more sons, named John (1852-1904), James Owen (1854-1922), Roswell (1862-1931) and Lincoln (1894-1931).

Like his father, Thomas Goldie became a well educated man, having studied at the Wellington District Grammar School, McGill University in Montreal, and the Eastman National Business College in Poughkeepsie, New York. He also gained valuable business experience while working in Milwaukee and Montreal.

In 1876, Thomas Goldie married Emma J. Mitchell (1853-1940). She and Thomas lived in the house known as Rosehurst, originally built for Dr. William Clarke. Thomas and Emma had five children: Frances (1879- ), Ruth (1881- ), Thomas Leon (1882-1916), Roswell Thompson (1887- ) and Emma Gwendolyn (1890- ).

Thomas Goldie became the manager of his father's mill and acted as president, while his brothers, James Owen and Roswell, were vice-president and secretary of the company respectively. During these years, the mill continued to flourish with the addition of railway spur lines built in 1881 and 1888.

Thomas Goldie became involved in local politics and was elected as an alderman for the St. David's Ward in 1881, 1883, 1884, and 1885-1890, serving on various committees and boards.

Thomas also served as a high school trustee, from 1882 to 1884, and was an active leader of the Wellington Conservative Association, especially in Guelph. For nine years, he also served as the Chairman of the Board of Managers of Knox Church in Guelph.

In 1891, Thomas Goldie was elected mayor of Guelph and proceeded with an ambitious campaign of public works improvments, including the waterworks and distribution system, electrical delivery system, and construction of permanent sidewalks. He was also responsible for the hiring of Guelph's first City Engineer to manage these local improvement projects. Thomas was re-elected mayor in January, 1892. He died on February 4, 1892, the second of Guelph's mayors to die while in office.

For more historical information on the Goldie family, please see B.M. Durtnell's article: Guelph's Beloved Mayor. The article can be found in the Guelph Historical Society's publication, Historic Guelph, volume XXIX, September 1990, p. 4-15.

Goldie family collection

  • C4
  • Family
  • ca. 1845-ca. 1970]

The Goldie family were prominent mill owners, citizens and politicians in Guelph. James Goldie (1824-1912) and his wife, Frances Owen (1824-1908) and young son Thomas (1850-1892), moved to Guelph in 1850 from Utica, New York, where James had learned the milling trade. After his arrival in Guelph, James Goldie bought and rebuilt two mills in the area. In 1860, he purchased a barrel and stave factory, located on present-day Speedvale Avenue by the Speed River. On this site, he built a flour mill and a new house for his family. In 1866, he also purchased the burned out remains and land of the People's Mill on Cardigan Street by the river. When this mill was rebuilt, he sold the Speedvale mill to John Pipe in 1867-1868. The family then moved into a house on Cardigan Street. By this time, James and Frances Goldie had four more sons, named John (1852-1904), James Owen (1854-1922), Roswell (1862-1931) and Lincoln (1894-1931).
Like his father, Thomas Goldie became a well educated man, having studied at the Wellington District Grammar School, McGill University in Montreal, and the Eastman National Business College in Poughkeepsie, New York. He also gained valuable business experience while working in Milwaukee and Montreal.

In 1876, Thomas Goldie married Emma J. Mitchell (1853-1940). She and Thomas lived in the house known as Rosehurst, originally built for Dr. William Clarke. Thomas and Emma had five children: Frances (1879- ), Ruth (1881- ), Thomas Leon (1882-1916), Roswell Thompson (1887- ) and Emma Gwendolyn (1890- ).

Thomas Goldie became the manager of his father's mill and acted as president, while his brothers, James Owen and Roswell, were vice-president and secretary of the company respectively. During these years, the mill continued to flourish with the addition of railway spur lines built in 1881 and 1888.

Thomas Goldie became involved in local politics and was elected as an alderman for the St. David's Ward in 1881, 1883, 1884, and 1885-1890, serving on various committees and boards.

Thomas also served as a high school trustee, from 1882 to 1884, and was an active leader of the Wellington Conservative Association, especially in Guelph. For nine years, he also served as the Chairman of the Board of Managers of Knox Church in Guelph.

In 1891, Thomas Goldie was elected mayor of Guelph and proceeded with an ambitious campaign of public works improvments, including the waterworks and distribution system, electrical delivery system, and construction of permanent sidewalks. He was also responsible for the hiring of Guelph's first City Engineer to manage these local improvement projects. Thomas was re-elected mayor in January, 1892. He died on February 4, 1892, the second of Guelph's mayors to die while in office.

For more historical information on the Goldie family, please see B.M. Durtnell's article: Guelph's Beloved Mayor. The article can be found in the Guelph Historical Society's publication, Historic Guelph, volume XXIX, September 1990, p. 4-15.

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