Showing 32 results

People and organizations
Western University Archives and Special Collections

Bigelow, Jane

  • Person
  • 1928 -

Jane Bigelow (1928 - ) was a politician and the mayor of London, Ontario from 1972 to 1978. She also served as controller on the city's Board of Control before and after her term as mayor.
She was born in Toronto in 1928 and educated at St. Clement's Girl's School and the University of Toronto where she completed a B.A. in Physical and Health Education in 1950. She trained as a teacher and taught in high schools in Ottawa, Hamilton and Edmonton.
After settling in London in 1965 with her husband and two children, she took courses at the University of Western Ontario towards a B.A. and began a master's program in urban studies. She participated in the founding of the Central London Association and the Urban League, a group that was designed to coordinate the efforts of local citizens' groups. She also became involved in the London Council of Women, serving on the committee which helped save the Broughdale Lands. Bigelow was active in local and provincial NDP organizations, serving as vice-president of the provincial party from 1968 to 1972. She organized several conventions for the party and was responsible for the Handbook for Municipal Politicians, published in 1968.
In 1969, she was elected to the Board of Control and when she was re-elected in 1971, she received the most votes out of all the controllers making her the deputy mayor. When mayor Fred Gosnell resigned for health reasons in February 1972 she took over as acting mayor. In March 1972, Bigelow was elected mayor by council and in 1973 she was elected mayor by the public in a general election. She was re-elected in 1974 and 1976 but was defeated in the 1978 election by Al Gleeson, an instructor at Fanshawe College.
As mayor, Jane Bigelow advocated for accessible day care, better public transit with special fares for senior citizens, neighbourhood improvement schemes, funding for the arts, more parks and better city planning. She was criticized for being uninterested in development. During her mayoralty, London received a triple A rating from two independent American organizations. In her last years of office, she became interested in financial planning and tax reform for municipalities. She was actively involved in several joint municipal-provincial organizations and represented London's interests at both higher levels of government. In 1974, she was invited with six other Canadian mayors to visit Israel and in 1976, she was a representative to the Habitat Conference and the Conference of Mayors held in Milan.
Some of the major issues during her term as mayor included the Talbot Square development, the London Regional Art gallery, the restoration of the Middlesex Court House and the possibility of siting a prison in London.
She was elected to the Board of Control in 1980 but did not run in 1982. She was later employed by Employment and Immigration Canada. She was honoured with several awards and recognitions for her public service.

Brandon, Mary Netta (Kingsmill)

  • Person
  • 1923 - 2011

Born August 27, 1923. Died 2011. Daughter of George Frederick Kingsmill and Netta May (Nixon) Kingsmill. Sister of Doris (Kingsmill) Hoskins and Thomas Frederick Kingsmill. Married Corporal Thomas Buchanan Brandon (June 6, 1938 - December 20, 1965), RCAF on December 16, 1944 at Bellevue Park. Parents of one child, Netta Nixon Brandon.

Brown, Vesey Agmondisham

  • Person
  • 1824 - 1895

Dr. Vesey Agmondisham Brown was a physician and amateur artist. Brown was born in Limerick, Ireland on 3 June 1824, the third of six children, to John-Southwell Brown and Margaret-Anne Vesey. Brown attended the Medical School of Trinity College at the University of Dublin in 1844 before completing training at the Royal College of Surgeons in London, England in October, 1848. He was appointed to the British Army as Assistant Surgeon in 1849 and was attached to the reserve battalion of the Twenty-third Regiment of Foot (Royal Welsh Fusiliers), which was ordered to London, Ontario in May, 1850. He became licensed to practise “physic, surgery and midwifery” in the Province of Canada a year later.

When the Twenty-third Regiment moved to Toronto in May of 1852, Brown remained in London and served as the physician in charge of enrolled pensioners. By 1856 he was also serving as physician to the Great Western Railway Company. He married Mary Jane Massingberd, daughter of Anglican Reverend Hompesch (sometimes Edward) Massingberd in that same year. They resided on Kent Street. For the majority of his medical career he worked as a general practitioner and surgeon out of the family's London home. He was also a skilled amateur artist. Brown died in London on September 4, 1895 at the age of 71.

Bucke, Richard Maurice

  • Person
  • 1837-1902

One of seven children, Richard Maurice Bucke was born on March 18, 1837 at Methwold, Norfolk, England to parents Horatio Walpole Bucke and Clarissa Andrews Bucke. His parents emigrated to Canada in his first year and settled in London, Ontario. At 16 Bucke left home and moved to the United States, where he worked in several locations as a labourer. In 1856 Bucke travelled to the Sierra Nevada where he joined forces with the prospectors Allen and Hosea Grosh. Hosea died within the year of blood poisoning, and in 1857 Bucke and Allen Grosh were lost in a snowstorm. They went 5 days and 4 nights without food or fire, until they arrived at a small mining camp. Grosh died of exhaustion and exposure, while Bucke recovered, despite losing one foot and part of the other to severe frostbite.

Upon his return to Canada in 1858, Bucke enrolled at McGill University to study medicine. He graduated in 1862 with the distinction of being the gold medalist of his year and winning a prize for his thesis, "The Correlation of Vital and Physical Forces." After spending time in Europe for post-graduate studies he returned to Sarnia to take over his late brother's medical practice. He was summoned to California in 1864 to give evidence in the Comstock Lode Litigation before returning to Canada in 1865 where he married Jessie Maria Gurd and settled down to practice medicine in Sarnia for the following ten years. Bucke and his wife had 8 children: Clare Georgina (1866 - 1867), Maurice Andrews (1868 - 1899), Jessie Clare (1870 - 1943), William Augustus (1873 - 1933), Edward Pardee (1875 - 1913), Ina Matilda (1877 - 1968), Harold Langmuir (1879 - 1951) and Robert Walpole (1881 - 1923). His first born, Clare Georgina, died at 10 months old, and his eldest son, Maurice Andrews, was killed in an accident in 1899.

Bucke was appointed Medical Superintendent at the new mental hospital in Hamilton in 1876, and after a year he was transferred to the Ontario Hospital in London where he served for 25 years. Bucke read Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" in 1867 and claimed it to be one of the most important events of his life. He travelled to New Jersey to meet Whitman in 1877 which marked the beginning of a long, close friendship between the two men. Upon Whitman's death in 1892, Bucke became one of his literary executors and was a pall bearer at his funeral.

Bucke was one of the first of his time to depart from orthodox therapeutics at the Asylum. By 1882 he had abolished the medicinal use of alcohol in the Asylum and by 1883 he had discontinued the use of physical restraints and initiated an open-door policy. He also pioneered many surgical "cures" for lunacy, including gynaecological surgery.

Bucke was an active writer, and his many noted works include several psychiatric papers, "Walt Whitman, a biography of the man," "Man's Moral Nature," and "Cosmic Consciousness," the last of which has been held in high esteem for many years and reprinted many times since its publication.

Bucke was one of the founders of the University of Western Ontario's Medical School and in 1882 was appointed Professor of Nervous and Mental Diseases, as well as elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. Bucke delivered the opening academic lecture of the year at McGill University by request of the medical faculty in 1891. He became President of the Psychological Section of the British Medical Association in 1897, and the following year he was elected President of the American Medico-Psychological Association.

Bucke died suddenly after slipping on the veranda of his home and striking his head on February 19, 1902. He is buried in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London, Ontario.

Durand and Moore Architects

  • Corporate body
  • c1882 - 1888

Durand then partnered with architect John M. Moore. In 1888, a legal dispute between Durand and Moore dissolved their partnership.

Durand, George F.

  • Person
  • 1850 - 1889

George F. Durand was born in 1850 to James Durand, a building and contracting business owner in London, Ontario. Noticing his son’s artistic ability, James Durand wrote to sculptor and drawing teacher J.R. Peel in 1964 arranging for his son to enroll at Peel’s school. In the late 1860s, Durand articled for architect William Robinson where he met his friend and future partner Thomas Tracy. After his apprenticeship, he was hired by Thomas Fuller to work on the New York State Capital building in Albany, New York. The project became embroiled in scandal when the cost of the building ballooned to well over the original projected cost. As a result of the controversy, Fuller was dismissed which led to Durand leaving the project as well. His experience in New York lasted from 1870 to 1876.
Durand returned to London and formed a partnership with Robinson and Tracy in 1878. In 1880, Robinson left and Tracy and Durand worked as partners. This partnership lasted until Tracy became city engineer and Durand then partnered with architect John M. Moore. In 1888, a legal dispute between Durand and Moore dissolved their partnership. In 1889, Durand began to take large lengths of time off work due to illness and on December 20th of that year he passed away.

Eisenhardt, Jan, 1906-2004

  • AFC 451
  • Person
  • 1906-2004

Jan (Ian) Eisenhardt was born April 24th, 1906 in Hjørring, Denmark. After attending schools in Denmark and France, Eisenhardt received a scholarship to study at the University of British Columbia’s School of Commerce in 1928. From 1929-1930, Eisenhardt worked as a Playground Attendant for the City of Vancouver before returning to France to play professional football (soccer) for the Olympique de Marseille football club. In 1932, Eisenhardt returned to Vancouver and became the Playground Supervisor for Vancouver. In 1933, Eisenhardt became a Canadian citizen.

In 1934, as the Director of Physical Education for the Province of BC, Eisenhardt developed and led the Provincial Recreation program, popularly known as Pro Rec. In this role and as the Chairman of a federal committee on Youth Welfare, Eisenhardt developed recreation and fitness programs for the unemployed during the Depression. At the outbreak of World War II, Eisenhardt enlisted in the Canadian Army, rising to the rank of Major and becoming the director of the Canadian Army Sports Program in 1943. In 1944, he was named National Director of Physical Fitness for Canada and appointed chair of the National Council on Physical Fitness where he participated in drafting the National Physical Fitness Act. After the war, Eisenhardt became the Director of Staff Activities for the United Nations in New York in 1947 and was later assigned to UNESCO in Paris.

In February of 1950, Eisenhardt became the Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation for the Indian Affairs branch of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration. In this role, he toured and drafted a physical education programme for residential schools and established the Tom Longboat Awards. By November of 1951, dissatisfied with the lack of support for the physical education program, Eisenhardt resigned from his position effective December 1951. In January 1952, shortly after beginning his job as the Director of Canadair Employees’ Recreation Association in Montreal, he was fired from this position after having allegedly been ‘blacklisted’ by the Canadian government. Eisenhardt later spent years working to clear his name and made a claim for compensation from the government.

In Quebec, Eisenhardt worked for the Community Club in La Tuque in 1953 and was hired by the Dominion Life Assurance Company in Montreal in 1954. Eisenhardt was active in the Danish community in Canada, serving as President of the Danish Club in Montreal from 1960-1965. In the 1970s, Eisenhardt worked as a lecturer of Scandinavian literature and Campus Administrator for John Abbott College where he organized tours of Denmark and East Germany for students. Eisenhardt continued to promote fitness and recreation initiatives, including crossing the Øresund Bridge from Denmark to Sweden in 2000 and Walk for Health, where he visited elementary schools to promote staying active. As a resident of Dorval, Eisenhardt ran for Alderman in 1992 and Mayor in 1998.

Later in life, Eisenhardt received many accolades for his contributions to sport and recreation in Canada including a Canadian Sports Lifetime Achievement Award, a Queen’s Jubilee Medal, and was a member of the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame and the Order of Canada. He received an honorary Doctorate of Laws from Malaspina University College (now Vancouver Island University) in 2004. Jan Eisenhardt married Barbara Ferdon in 1949 and had four children. Barbara died in 1995 and Jan Eisenhardt died on December 26, 2004 at the age of 98.

Hodgins, Alice Ruth (Kingsmill)

  • Person
  • 1900 -

Alice Ruth was born August 22, 1900 and was the daughter of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr. and Kate Isabel (Ford) Kingsmill. She was sister of Thomas Ford Kingsmill and George Frederick Kingsmill.

She married Dr. Emerson Leroy Hodgins (April 28, 1878 -August 26, 1971) on September 26, 1926. They had two children: Thomas Emerson and Arthur Frazer.

Kemp, Penn

  • Person
  • 1944 -

Penn Kemp is a London, Ontario based poet, playwright, performer, editor, and educator.

Penn Kemp was born Patricia Penn Anne Kemp in Strathroy, Ontario on August 4, 1944. Raised in London, Ontario by parents, artist James (Jim) Kemp and Anne Kemp, Penn Kemp went on to complete a BA (Hon.) in English Language and Literature at the University of Western Ontario in 1966 and an Ontario Teacher’s Certificate at Althouse College in 1967. After graduating, Kemp taught English at high schools in Timmins and North York until 1970 when she began performing, giving readings, and leading creativity workshops. In 1988, Kemp completed a M.Ed. at the University of Toronto’s Ontario Institute for Studies in Education with a thesis entitled "Invenio: The Source of a Biography in Mythology." After living in Toronto for many years, Kemp returned to London, Ontario in 2001 where she has since been active in the local literary community. In 2010, Kemp became the inaugural Poet Laureate for London.

Kemp has published over 30 volumes of poetry and drama both through her own company, Pendas Productions, and other publishers. A frequent collaborator, Kemp has also produced plays, CDs, videopoems, participatory performances, and "Sound Operas." Kemp has travelled to Europe, North Africa, Mexico, South America and India giving readings, performances, and workshops, with tours in India and Brazil through the Association of Canadian Studies with supported by Canada Council for the Arts. She served as The University of Western Ontario’s Writer-in-Residence for 2009-10 and has been the writer-in-residence in many communities in North America, India, and Scotland.

Kemp was awarded the League of Canadian Poets’ Life Membership Award in 2012 and the Sheri-D Wilson Golden Beret Award for excellence and innovation in spoken word poetry in 2015. Kemp was also awarded a QEII Diamond Jubilee medal for service to arts and culture in London.

Kemp runs Pendas Productions with husband, Gavin Stairs. She has two children, Amanda and Jake Chalmers.

Kingsmill Jr., Thomas Frazer

  • Person
  • 1865 - 1939

Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr. was born September 1, 1865. He was the son of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill and Anne Ardagh Burris Kingsmill. He married Kate Isobel Ford (1861-1940) of England on June 18, 1890 in a double wedding along with his sister Alice Maud and her husband Edgar Bray. It was the last wedding at St Jerome's Church, Old London. The reception was held at Bellevue Farm. Together, they had three children: Thomas Ford, George Frederick and Alice Ruth.

Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr. started working at Kingsmill's in 1878 and ran the company from 1915 - 1939. He rebuilt the store from the ground up twice, after fires in 1911 and 1932. He was a life member of St. John's Lodge 209A of the Masonic Order, and Mocha Temple. He was also active in the local Anglican community at St. George's Church and St. Paul's Cathedral, and was an ordained Anglican Minister.

He died suddenly of a heart attack in 1939 at the age of 74.

Kingsmill's Ltd.

  • Corporate body
  • 1865 - 2014

The iconic Kingsmill department store was founded as a dry goods store in London, Ontario in 1865 by Thomas Frazer Kingsmill (1840-1915). He and his wife, Anne immigrated from County Tipperary, Ireland in 1858. Kingsmill's department store was successfully run by Thomas Frazer Kingsmill's direct descendants until it closed in 2014. The history of the family is inextricably linked with that of the store.

The store at 130 Dundas street, London, Ontario operated from 1876-2014. It survived two fires (1911 and 1932) and expanded over the years to include at times: a carpet warehouse, a Chatham location and a kitchen store (2001 -2014). The Kingsmill family also operated a real estate business in London and surrounding areas in Southwestern Ontario in the early 20th century. The first family farm, Bellevue was sold to Western University for their new campus in 1916. The family later owned and operated a dairy at Bellevue Park Farm off of Sarnia Road. The store continued to operate successfully in the same location at until its closing.

The Kingsmill family has contributed significantly to the social, political and religious life of the city of London. Family members were well-known in many different local circles, acting as chairs, presidents and committee members for a number of commercial, academic, religious, political and charitable organizations. Thomas Ford Kingsmill served as Mayor of London from 1936-1938 George Frederick Kingsmill was a board member at Huron College, and as the bell-ringer and clock maintenance worker at St. Paul's Cathedral for most of his life. Thomas Frazer Kingsmill, Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr, Thomas Ford Kingsmill, George Frederick Kingsmill and T. Fred Kingsmill were all actively involved in London's Masonic community. Thomas Frederick Kingsmill was a major member of London's Downtown Business Association, as well as the Ad and Sales Club. Henry Ardagh Kingsmill and George Frederick Kingsmill.were active in the military, serving in WWI.

When the store closed, it had grown to 73,000 square feet on five floors and had operated successfully for 148 years. Tim Kingsmill, the last store president, closed Kingsmill's Department Store on August 10, 2014.

Kingsmill, Arthur

  • Person
  • 1870 - 1898

Arthur Kingsmill was born in 1870 and died 1898. Son of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill and Anne (Ardagh) (Burris) Kingsmill. He married Jane “Jennie” King on July 1, 1891. Together they had three children: Arthur King, Jack Ardagh and Marjorie.
Arthur ran a second Kingsmill's location on King Street in Chatham, across from the market. Arthur died tragically young at the age of 28 from blood poisoning and the Chatham Kingsmill's location closed for good.

Kingsmill, George Frederick

  • Person
  • 1892 - 1973

George Frederick Kingsmill (1892-1973). Son of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr. and Kate Isabel (Ford) Kingsmill. He and Netta May Nixon (June 1, 1888 - August 30, 1976) were married on October 11, 1918. They had three children: Mary Netta, Doris, and Thomas Frederick.

He held a Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and majored in beekeeping at the O.A.C. Upon graduation, he was appointed Assistant Dominion Apiarist.

During WWI he enlisted as a gunner and served in France with “E” Battery. He was decorated as an M.B.E (Member of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire) and for Civilian Service in WWII.

He was involved in the London community including: as a member of Huron College Council; Chairman, Dependents Board of Trustees, London District, 1940-45; a member of the Canadian Consistory Club; Advertising and Sales Club; Camera Club and was Deputy for Ontario Ancient & Accepted Scottish Rite. He was also active in the local Anglican community serving for 43 years as bell-ringer and clock maintainer at St. Paul's Cathedral.

Active in Bellevue Park Farms, Bellevue Park Farms Dairy. He served as Secretary-Treasurer for Kingsmill's Limited from 1920 - 1923.

Kingsmill, Henry Ardagh

  • Person
  • 1867 - 1920

Born July 2, 1867. Died 1920. Son of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill and Anne (Ardagh) (Burris) Kingsmill. Henry Ardagh Kingsmill married Inez Ethelyn Smith (1870-1956), an American singer, in 1902. They had two children: Sidney Ardagh and Eleanor.

He graduated with a medical degree from Western University in 1895, and served in the Canadian Army Medical Corps. His name is on a campus plaque honouring Western University's soldiers of WWI. He died during a soldier's flu epidemic in 1920 at the age of 53.

Kingsmill, James

  • Person
  • 1885 - 1945

James Kingsmill (1885-1945) was the son of Robert Frazer Kingsmill and Mary F Centrillion. Brother of Thomas Frazer, Robert, Arthur and Frank J. NOTE: He and his siblings are nephews of founder Thomas Frazer Kingsmill and Arthur Kingsmill, not to be confused as the same people.

Kingsmill, Robert Frazer

  • Person

Robert Frazer Kingsmill was the brother of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill. He immigrated with his mother Mary (Frazer) Kingsmill to Toronto in 1952. He married Mary E. Centrillion and together they had 5 children: James William, Thomas Frazer, Robert, Arthur Henry and Frank J. He operated a dry goods store on Dundas St, a couple of doors away from his brother Thomas Frazer.

Kingsmill, Thomas Ford

  • Person
  • 1891 - 1970

Born April 24, 1891. Died March 29, 1970. Son of Thomas Frazer Kingsmill (Jr.) and Kate Isabel (Ford) Kingsmill. Brother of George Frederick Kingsmill and Alice Ruth (Kingsmill) Hodgins. He married Margaret Campbell (October 10, 1889 - June 25, 1968) on October 27, 1917. They had one child, Katherine Elizabeth.

Thomas Ford Kingsmill was heavily involved in the London community. He was elected to the Victoria Hospital Trust 3 times, and resigned to run for mayor. He was elected Mayor of London in 1936, 1937 and 1938. He then returned to the Victoria Hospital Trust. Appointed provincial representative on the Hospital Trust in 1948, serving until 1960. He was a member of: Kiwanis Club, St Paul's Cathedral's Men's Club, St. John's Lodge No. 209a, Mocha Shrine, Knights Templars and the Orange Order. Was a 32nd degree Mason in the Scottish Rite.

He became managing director of Kingsmill's Limited in 1915 when his father Thomas Frazer Jr. became head of the business. He was subsequently elected president and general manager of Kingsmill's Ltd in 1939 upon the death of his father. Remained as such until 1968, when he relinquished the position but remained as director until his death. He held a directorship in the Ontario branch of the Retail Merchants Association, and was active in the London Chamber of Commerce.

Kingsmill, Thomas Frazer

  • Person
  • 1840 - 1915

Thomas Frazer Kingsmill : born in Ireland in 1840 and died in 1915 in Canada. Married Anne (Ardagh) (Burris) in 1857. Immigrated to the United States before settling in Canada in 1860. Moved to London in 1864.
6 children: Mary Kingsmill, Ann Kingsmill, Alice Maud Kingsmill, Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr., Arthur Kingsmill and Henry Ardagh Kingsmill.
Thomas Frazer Kingsmill had a 2nd bigamous marriage to Margaret (Gill) Kingsmill. They had 3 children: Percy Kingsmill, Irene Kingsmill and Vernon Kingsmill.
Thomas Frazer Kingsmill founded Kingsmill's as a dry goods store in London in March 1865. He also opened Kingsmill's Carpet Warehouse, which closed in the early-middle 1900's. He was President of Kingsmill's until his death in 1915. After his death Margaret went to court to challenge his will, which left the bulk of the estate to Thomas Frazer Kingsmill Jr. She declared Thomas Frazer Sr. intended to leave the Kingsmill Carpet

Kingsmill, Thomas Frederick

  • Person
  • 1928 -

Born December 18, 1928. Son of George Frederick Kingsmill and Netta May (Nixon) Kingsmill. Fred married Clarissa “Claire” Barker (June 20, 193(1?) - ) on October 31, 1952. They had two children: Timothy Frederick and Anne Ardagh.

He was very active in the London business and retail community. He was a major member of London's Downtown Business Association, as well as the Ad and Sales Club. In 1990, he received a letter from Prime Minister Brian Mulroney congratulating him on the 125th Anniversary of Kingsmill's department store. He is noted for his dedication to charitable works, including Victoria Hospital and The Salvation Army.

He was awarded the Ontario Medal of Good Citizenship in 1991 which recognizes those who have made exceptional long-term efforts towards the well-being of their community.

He was President of Kingsmill Limited from 1970 - 2003.

Kingsmill, Timothy Frederick

  • Person
  • 1954 -

Born November 12, 1954. Son of Thomas Frederick Kingsmill and Clarissa "Claire" (Barker) Kingsmill. Married Laurie Martha Glass on October 3, 1992. They are parents to Emily Kingsmill.

Tim Kingsmill was President of Kingsmill Limited from 2003-2014. He created the first website for Kingsmill's in the 1990's.

In 2001 Kingsmill's expanded into a previously rented space at 128 Dundas to create Kingsmill's Next Door, a specialty kitchen store.

Both the store buildings and the business were put up for sale on September 27, 2013. The store closed for good on August 10, 2014.

Results 1 to 20 of 32