Showing 23 results

People and organizations
University of Ontario Institute of Technology and Durham College

Canadian Nuclear Society

  • Corporate body

About the Society
The Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS) promotes the exchange of information on all aspects of nuclear science and technology and its applications. This includes nuclear power generation, fuel production, uranium mining and refining, management of radioactive wastes and used fuel. Other topics include medical and industrial uses of radionuclides, occupational and environmental radiation protection, the science and technology of nuclear fusion, and associated activities in research and development. The CNS membership is intended for the individual directly involved with nuclear technology in any of the above areas, or one simply interested in nuclear topics.
The Canadian Nuclear Society was established in 1979 as "The technical society of the Canadian Nuclear Association (CNA)". In 1998 the CNS incorporated independently as a federal, not-for-profit corporation.
The CNS is a member of the Engineering Institute of Canada (EIC).
Objectives of the CNS
The objectives of the Canadian Nuclear Society are as follows:
• to act as a forum for the exchange of information relating to nuclear science and technology;
• to foster the development and beneficial utilization of nuclear science and technology for peaceful uses;
• to encourage education in, and knowledge about, nuclear science and technology; and • to enhance the professional and technical capabilities of those involved in
nuclear science and technology in the Canadian context.
The CNS conducts its affairs through a council whose members are elected by the membership. The council is responsible to the membership in the development of policies and programs.
The CNS is organized into branches and technical divisions; both are directed towards involvement of the individual member:
• Branches are established on a location basis and hold local meetings and topical seminars on issues of interest.
• Technical divisions are established on a discipline basis and handle specific technical areas of interest. They organize conferences and promote and support Canadian participation in the world-wide exchange of nuclear-related technical information.

Durham College of Applied Arts and Technology

  • Corporate body
  • 1967-current

In 2001, when UOIT began on the Durham College campus, several departments functioned as shared services between the two institutions. As the university grew, the services were realigned to more appropriate service the individual institutions.

Durham Strategic Energy Alliance

  • Corporate body
  • 2006 - current

Durham Region has been home to a wealth of energy-sector expertise for more than 40 years, combining progressive government and a knowledgeable and supportive host community.
From 2005 to 2015, the Durham Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA) addressed the energy challenges facing Ontario and Canada by bringing together active participants from the community in the global quest for clean, sustainable, affordable energy solutions.
About DSEA: A non-profit organization comprised of business, government and educational institutions working together for the advancement of energy initiatives, the Durham Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA) was established in 2005 with 11 founding members:
Region of Durham
City of Oshawa
City of Pickering
Town of Ajax
Town of Whitby
Municipality of Clarington
Ontario Power Generation
Siemens Canada
Veridian
Enbridge Inc.
University of Ontario Institute of Technology
Vision: The vision of the Durham Strategic Energy Alliance (DSEA) is to position Durham Region as a recognized leader in providing timely, sustainable and reliable energy solutions.
Mission: DSEA’s mission is to foster an energy-friendly environment in Durham Region that is a model for action in Ontario and Canada in the 21st century. To achieve this, DSEA will foster partnerships, provide leadership and establish relationships among communities and all levels of government, business and education.

The Andrew H. Wilson Collection

  • Person
  • 1887 to 2006

This collection was obtained from Andrew H. Wilson, P.Eng., FEIC, Chair of the History Committee of Engineering Institute of Canada and Canadian Society for Manufacturing Engineers. Originally called the Canadian Society of Engineers in 1887 and renamed to the Engineering Institute of Canada in 1981.

The Canadian Academy of Engineering

  • Corporate body
  • 1987 - 2013

This collection was obtained from Andrew H. Wilson, P.Eng., FEIC, Chair of the History Committee of Engineering Institute of Canada and Canadian Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Originally called the Canadian Society of Engineers in 1887 and renamed to the Engineering Institute of Canada in 1981.

The Canadian Society for Civil Engineering

  • Corporate body
  • 1887 – current

This collection was originally compiled by Andrew Wilson (Chair History and Archives Committee) and John Plant (Executive Director). Ownership was transferred to the UOIT Library Archives effective July 1, 2010. The materials were then evaluated, catalogued and processed by B. J. Jackson. Finding Aids and the online access were made available December 15, 2010. Accruals are expected on an annual basis.

The Canadian Society for Mechanical Engineering

  • Corporate body
  • 1968 – 2006

This collection was originally compiled by Andrew Wilson (Chair History and Archives Committee) and John Plant (Executive Director). Ownership was transferred to the UOIT Library Archives effective July 1, 2010. The materials were then evaluated, catalogued and processed by B. J. Jackson. Finding Aids and the online access were made available December 15, 2010. Accruals are expected on an annual basis

The Canadian Society of Senior Engineers

  • Corporate body
  • 2005 - current

(a) Although The CSSE was established in 2002, The CSSE History and archives Committee was not struck until 2009. Its first chairman and archivist was Arnold Eyre, who solicited, collected and stored whatever archival material from 2009 to 2011, when Don Lawson took over as chairman and archivist, storing the archival material until his death late in 2012. The UOIT collected the archival material from Don's son early in 2013. (b) The CSSE, formerly The Life Members Organization (The LMO), a committee of The Council of The Engineering Institute of Canada (The EIC), was incorporated as a Member Society of The EIC on September 22, 2002, as requested by Leonard A. Bateman, Chairman of the LMO. On a motion by Guy Gosselin, seconded by Mohamed El-Hawary, the resolution “That the LMO’s application for membership as a Member Society be accepted”, was approved
by resolution of The Council, chaired by EIC President Kenneth W. Putt.

The Donald S. Lawson Collection

  • Person
  • 1944 - 2012

The records within the collection were received as a donation from the family of Donald S. Lawson, former President, CANDU Operations, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Donald Lawson was born January 18, 1935 in Liverpool, England, and passed away December 19, 2012. Some records were integrated into F-16000, the collection of the Canadian Society of
Senior Engineers. The remaining records were more appropriately organized within a specialized collection, F-20000, the Nuclear Industry. F-20000 is not affiliated with the Canadian Nuclear Society. The three series identified provide a brief historical perspective to the Canadian and international nuclear industry.

The Engineering Institute of Canada

  • Corporate body
  • 1887 – 2009

This collection was obtained from Andrew H. Wilson, P.Eng., FEIC, Chair of the History Committee of Engineering Institute of Canada and Canadian Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Originally called the Canadian Society of Engineers in 1887 and renamed to the Engineering Institute of Canada in 1981.

The Mackenzie Pipeline Inquiry

  • Corporate body
  • April 1975 - October 1976

Source: Library and Archives Canada, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development fonds
(http://collectionscanada.gc.ca/pam_archives/index.php?fuseaction=genitem.displayItem&lang=eng&rec_nbr=383&rec_nbr_list=383,4106401,188175,799,4107599,142305,142321,142307,142315,188211)
Copyright: Copyright belongs to the Crown.
The Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry was established by P. C. 1974-641 of 21 March 1974. Justice Thomas R. Berger was empowered "to inquire into and report upon the terms and conditions that should be The Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry was established by P. C. 1974- 641 of 21 March 1974. Justice Thomas R. Berger was empowered "to inquire into and report upon the terms and conditions that should be imposed in respect of any right-of-way that might be granted across Crown lands for the purposes of the proposed Mackenzie Valley Pipeline." The Inquiry was to pay special regard to "the social, environmental, and economic impact regionally of the construction, operation and subsequent abandonment of the proposed pipeline in the Yukon and Northwest Territories." Berger was authorized to hold hearings in the Territories and elsewhere, summon witnesses to testify under oath, compel the production of documents, and engage the services of engineers, technical advisers, legal council, and suitable clerical and reporting assistance. His final two-volume Report appeared during 1977. Volume I, Northern Frontier Northern Homeland, dealt in broad general terms with the social, cultural, economic and environmental impacts of an energy corridor and gas pipeline in the Mackenzie Valley, and with the issue of native claims. Volume II, Terms and Conditions, dealt with the social, economic, environmental and
technical and construction conditions to be imposed if the pipeline were built and the energy corridor established. The main recommendations were that, because of environmental factors, no pipeline or energy corridor should be permitted across the Northern Yukon; that delivery of Alaskan gas to the Lower 48 States would be best accomplished by the Alaskan Highway route; that the construction of a pipeline along the Mackenzie Valley would be feasible from an environmental point of view; and that any Mackenzie Valley pipeline of energy corridor should be postponed for ten years to allow for a settlement of native land claims. The National Energy Board reached similar conclusions and the Government
adopted the Alaska Highway Route as official policy and on that basis concluded an agreement with the United States. The Reports, which were presented to the Minister of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, were based on presentations and arguments brought forth by a number of native, environmental and oil and gas companies. Preliminary hearings were at Yellowknife, Inuvik, Whitehorse and Ottawa during May and June 1974 and again at Yellowknife in September 1974. Preliminary rulings were issued on 12
July and 29 October 1974. Commencing 3 March 1975, a week of overview hearings began at Yellowknife where a number of participants made opening statements without cross-examination, on the general subjects of importance to the inquiry. Those making presentations were: the Canadian Arctic Gas Pipeline Limited; Foothills Pipelines Limited; Canadian Arctic Resources Committee (CAR) representing the Canadian Nature Federation, Federation of Ontario Naturalists, Pollution Prove, and the Canadian Environmental Law
Association; Commission Counsel; Special Counsel; Committee for Original Peoples Entitlement (COPE); Council for Yukon Indians; Environment Protection Board; Indian Brotherhood of the Northwest Territories/Metis Association of the Northwest Territories; Northwest Territories Mental Health Association; Northwest Territories Association of Municipalities; Northwest Territories Chamber of Commerce; and the Imperial Oil Limited, Gulf Oil Limited, and Shell Canada Limited.
Formal hearings began on 11 March 1975 with the witnesses called by each participant presenting evidence that was subject to crossexamination.
In addition to the formal hearings, the Inquiry travelled between April 1975 and August 1976 to all 35 communities in the Mackenzie Valley region, the Delta and Beaufort Sea Region and the Northern Yukon to hear evidence from residents in their own languages in their home communities. In May and June 1976, hearings were also held in ten major centres throughout Canada from Vancouver to Halifax. The hearings ended in Yellowknife on 19 November 1976 following a week of final arguments by the participants. The records of the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry were transferred to the National Archives of Canada in February 1978. All records are open to the public for research purposes. 1974: The Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry under Mr. Justice Thomas R. Berger was created to investigate the conditions under which Arctic gas could be transported from the Mackenzie Delta to southern markets. The Northern Pipelines unit of the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development worked with the Berger Commission from 1974 to 1977 by supplying staff and expertise for this widely publicized study. The possible impact of northern pipeline construction on social and cultural life, and on native land claims, which was
highlighted by the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline Inquiry and the contemporary Alaska Highway Pipeline Inquiry (Lysyk Commission), increased the importance of the pipeline and environmental units of the Northern Affairs Program.

The Norman L. Williams Collection

  • Person
  • 1930s to 2005.

The records were received from Norman L. Williams in January 2014. Norman Williams passed February, 2014. F-22000 is not sanctioned by the Canadian Nuclear Society. The series identified reflect Mr. Williams’ career in Canada and internationally, with specific focus on Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, British Columbia, Ontario and his international involvements.

The Robert F. Legget Collection

  • Person
  • 1968 - 2006

This collection was held by Paul Karrow and donated to the UOIT Library Archives through Michel Aubertin, President, Canadian Geotechnical Society. The original collection was maintain by Paul Karrow. Ownership was transferred to the UOIT Library Archives effective June 1, 2010. The materials were then evaluated, catalogued and processed by Brenda J. Jackson. Finding Aids and the online access were made available March 2011. No further accruals are expected.

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